Publication:
Public Procurement Reform in Iraq : A Long and Difficult Road

dc.contributor.authorAli, Nazaneen Ismail
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorLipson, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorIsoldi, Fabio
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T17:24:13Z
dc.date.available2014-11-19T17:24:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.description.abstractOver the course of a six-year period from 2006-2011, the Government of Iraq (GOI), with support from the World Bank, undertook an ambitious effort to reform its public procurement system and legal framework. Among other actions, an Inter-Ministerial Task Force (IMTF) was created, consultations were held with civil society and the private sector, and a comprehensive new law was drafted based on international best practices. In some ways, the challenges to reforming Iraq's public procurement system mirror the usual obstacles in implementing public sector reforms. However, given the country context, this case also presents unique and important lessons that helped inform future-decision making on public procurement reform in other conflict states. Finally, the Iraqi experience showed the importance of adapting gradual fixes in tackling institution building. While maintaining a long-term vision is important, it becomes critical in a post-conflict environment to demonstrate early results. Public procurement in Iraq is a major component of the national economy, cutting across nearly every area of planning, program management, and budgeting. In 2013, Iraq's approved budget was valued at US$118.3 billion, in addition to an expected US$10 billion in supplementary budget items. The lack of a clear legal framework for public procurement also discouraged foreign investment, since foreign investors were uninterested in coming to invest in Iraq if they had no type of legal assurance that bidding would be competitive, and that their bids would be treated equally and fairly. Procurement reform also becomes particularly challenging since public procurement reform means tackling corruption. Thus, it is no surprise that procurement reform in Iraq require patience, deliberativeness, and tolerance.en
dc.identifierhttp://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2013/12/18729223/public-procurement-reform-iraq-long-difficult-road
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10986/20560
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWorld Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMENA knowledge and learning quick notes series;no. 113
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subjectABUSE
dc.subjectACCOUNTABILITY
dc.subjectADMINISTRATIVE COURT
dc.subjectBEST PRACTICES
dc.subjectBIDDERS
dc.subjectBIDDING DOCUMENTS
dc.subjectBIDS
dc.subjectBUDGET EXECUTION
dc.subjectCIVIL SOCIETY
dc.subjectCOLLUSION
dc.subjectCOMPLAINTS
dc.subjectCORRUPTION
dc.subjectCORRUPTION PERCEPTION
dc.subjectCORRUPTION PERCEPTION INDEX
dc.subjectCOUNCIL OF MINISTERS
dc.subjectCREDIBILITY
dc.subjectDEFERRED PAYMENT
dc.subjectDISCRETION
dc.subjectEXISTING LEGAL FRAMEWORK
dc.subjectFINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectFOREIGN INVESTMENT
dc.subjectFOREIGN INVESTORS
dc.subjectFRAUD
dc.subjectGOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT
dc.subjectGOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT SYSTEM
dc.subjectINTEGRITY
dc.subjectINVESTMENT CLIMATE
dc.subjectLAWYERS
dc.subjectLEADERSHIP
dc.subjectLEGAL FRAMEWORK
dc.subjectLEGAL SYSTEM
dc.subjectPRIORITIES
dc.subjectPRIVATE SECTOR
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT DECISIONS
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT FUNCTION
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT LAW
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT METHODS
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT NOTICES
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT PROCEDURES
dc.subjectPROCUREMENT PROCESS
dc.subjectPUBLIC
dc.subjectPUBLIC CONTRACTS
dc.subjectPUBLIC EXPENDITURE
dc.subjectPUBLIC EXPENDITURE REVIEW
dc.subjectPUBLIC EXPENDITURES
dc.subjectPUBLIC INFORMATION
dc.subjectPUBLIC OFFICIALS
dc.subjectPUBLIC PROCUREMENT
dc.subjectPUBLIC PROCUREMENT REFORM
dc.subjectPUBLIC PROCUREMENT SYSTEM
dc.subjectPUBLIC SECTOR
dc.subjectREVENUE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectSANCTIONS
dc.subjectSERVICE DELIVERY
dc.subjectSTANDARD BIDDING
dc.subjectSTANDARD BIDDING DOCUMENTS
dc.subjectTRANSPARENCY
dc.titlePublic Procurement Reform in Iraq : A Long and Difficult Roaden
dspace.entity.typePublication
okr.date.disclosure2014-11-06
okr.doctypePublications & Research::Brief
okr.doctypePublications & Research
okr.docurlhttp://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2013/12/18729223/public-procurement-reform-iraq-long-difficult-road
okr.globalpracticeGovernance
okr.globalpracticeFinance and Markets
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum000356161_20131230155202
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum18729223
okr.identifier.report83728
okr.language.supporteden
okr.pdfurlhttp://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2013/12/30/000356161_20131230155202/Rendered/PDF/837280BRI0Box30e0series0QN1130Final.pdfen
okr.region.administrativeMiddle East and North Africa
okr.region.countryIraq
okr.topicPublic Sector Corruption and Anticorruption Measures
okr.topicCorruption and Anticorruption Law
okr.topicInternational Economics and Trade::Government Procurement
okr.topicFinance and Financial Sector Development::Bankruptcy and Resolution of Financial Distress
okr.topicPublic Sector Economics
okr.topicLaw and Development
okr.topicPublic Sector Development
okr.unitMNA Procurement (MNAPC)
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