Publication:
Entrepreneurship and the Allocation of Government Spending Under Imperfect Markets

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Date
2015-01
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Published
2015-01
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Abstract
Previous studies have established a negative relationship between total government spending and entrepreneurship activity. However, the relationship between the composition of government spending and entrepreneurial activity has been woefully under-researched. This paper fills this gap in the literature by empirically exploring the relationship between government spending on social and public goods and entrepreneurial activity under the assumption of credit market imperfections. By combining macroeconomic government spending data with individual-level entrepreneurship data, the analysis finds a positive relationship between increasing the share of social and public goods at the cost of private subsidies and entrepreneurship while confirming a negative relationship between total government consumption and entrepreneurial activity. The implication may be that expansion of total government spending includes huge increases in private subsidies, at the cost of social and public goods, and is detrimental for entrepreneurship.
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Islam, Asif. 2015. Entrepreneurship and the Allocation of Government Spending Under Imperfect Markets. Policy Research Working Paper;No. 7163. © World Bank Group, Washington, DC. http://hdl.handle.net/10986/21382 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.
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