Affordability and Subsidies in Public Urban Transport : What Do We Mean, What Can Be Done?

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collection.link.5
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/9
collection.name.5
Policy Research Working Papers
dc.contributor.author
Estupiñán, Nicolás
dc.contributor.author
Gómez-Lobo, Andrés
dc.contributor.author
Muñoz-Raskin, Ramón
dc.contributor.author
Serebrisky, Tomás
dc.date.accessioned
2012-06-08T18:52:36Z
dc.date.available
2012-06-08T18:52:36Z
dc.date.issued
2007-12
dc.date.lastModified
2021-04-23T14:02:35Z
dc.description.abstract
Subsidy policies on public urban transport have been adopted ubiquitously. In both developed and developing countries, subsidies are implemented to make transport more affordable. Despite their widespread implementation, there are virtually no quantitative assessments of their distributional incidence, making it impossible to determine if these instruments are pro-poor. This paper reviews the arguments used to justify subsidy policies in public urban transport. Using different tools to quantitatively evaluate the incidence and distributive impacts of subsidy policy options, the paper analyzes the findings of a series of research papers that study urban public transport subsidy policies in developed and developing countries. The available evidence indicates that current public urban transport subsidy policies do not make the poorest better off. Supply-side subsidies are, for the most part, neutral or regressive; while demand-side subsidies perform better-although many of them do not improve income distribution. Considering that the policy objective is to improve the welfare of the poorest, it is imperative to move away from supply-side subsidies towards demand-side subsidies and to integrate transport social concerns into wider poverty alleviation efforts, which include the possibility of channeling subsidies through monetary transfer systems or through other transfer instruments (food subsidies, health services and education for the poor). The general conclusion of the paper is that more effort should be devoted to improve the targeting properties of public urban transport subsidies using means-testing procedures to ensure a more pro-poor incidence of subsidies.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2007/12/8879859/affordability-subsidies-public-urban-transport-mean-can-done
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/7562
dc.language
English
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research Working Paper; No. 4440
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subject
ACCIDENTS
dc.subject
AFFORDABILITY INDEX
dc.subject
AFFORDABILITY INDICES
dc.subject
AFFORDABLE TRANSPORT
dc.subject
AIR
dc.subject
AIR CONDITIONING
dc.subject
AIR QUALITY
dc.subject
ALTERNATIVE MODES
dc.subject
ALTERNATIVE TRAVEL
dc.subject
ALTERNATIVE TRAVEL MODES
dc.subject
AUTOMOBILE
dc.subject
BENCHMARK
dc.subject
BUS
dc.subject
BUS COMPANIES
dc.subject
BUS COMPANY
dc.subject
BUS FARES
dc.subject
BUS OPERATORS
dc.subject
BUS SERVICE
dc.subject
BUS SERVICE OPERATORS
dc.subject
BUS SERVICES
dc.subject
BUS SUBSIDY
dc.subject
BUS SYSTEMS
dc.subject
BUS TRANSPORT
dc.subject
BUSES
dc.subject
CAPITAL SUBSIDIES
dc.subject
CAR
dc.subject
CAR USE
dc.subject
CAR USERS
dc.subject
CARS
dc.subject
COMMUTER RAIL
dc.subject
COMMUTING
dc.subject
CONCESSIONARY FARES
dc.subject
CONGESTION
dc.subject
CONGESTION TOLLS
dc.subject
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX
dc.subject
CONSUMERS
dc.subject
CONSUMPTION LEVELS
dc.subject
CONSUMPTION TAXES
dc.subject
COST OF TRAVEL
dc.subject
CROSS SUBSIDIES
dc.subject
CROSS SUBSIDY
dc.subject
DIESEL
dc.subject
DIESEL FUEL
dc.subject
ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY
dc.subject
ECONOMIC THEORY
dc.subject
ECONOMIES OF SCALE
dc.subject
ECONOMIES OF SCOPE
dc.subject
ELASTICITY
dc.subject
ELASTICITY OF DEMAND
dc.subject
ENVIRONMENTAL EXTERNALITIES
dc.subject
EXCLUSION
dc.subject
EXTERNALITIES
dc.subject
FARE STRUCTURE
dc.subject
FARES FOR STUDENTS
dc.subject
FLAT FARE
dc.subject
FLAT RATE
dc.subject
FLAT TARIFF
dc.subject
FOOD SUBSIDIES
dc.subject
FREE TRANSPORT
dc.subject
FUEL
dc.subject
FUEL DUTY
dc.subject
FUEL DUTY REBATE
dc.subject
FUEL PRICES
dc.subject
FUEL TAX
dc.subject
FUEL TAX REBATE
dc.subject
FUEL TAX REVENUES
dc.subject
FUELS
dc.subject
GASOLINE
dc.subject
GINI COEFFICIENT
dc.subject
GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES
dc.subject
HIGHER FARE
dc.subject
HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL
dc.subject
INCOME
dc.subject
INCOME GROUPS
dc.subject
INDIRECT SUBSIDY
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE GRANTS
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE SUBSIDY
dc.subject
INTERURBAN TRANSPORT
dc.subject
JOURNEYS
dc.subject
LABOR MARKET
dc.subject
LONGER TRIPS
dc.subject
LORENZ CURVE
dc.subject
LOW INCOME USERS
dc.subject
LOW TARIFFS
dc.title
Affordability and Subsidies in Public Urban Transport : What Do We Mean, What Can Be Done?
en
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2007/12/8879859/affordability-subsidies-public-urban-transport-mean-can-done
okr.globalpractice
Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience
okr.globalpractice
Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management
okr.globalpractice
Transport and ICT
okr.globalpractice
Transport and ICT
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/1813-9450-4440
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
000158349_20071213102316
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
8879859
okr.identifier.report
WPS4440
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2007/12/13/000158349_20071213102316/Rendered/PDF/wps4440.pdf
en
okr.topic
Taxation and Subsidies
okr.topic
Economic Theory and Research
okr.topic
Urban Development :: Transport in Urban Areas
okr.topic
Urban Transport
okr.topic
Transport Economics Policy and Planning
okr.topic
Transport
okr.topic
Macroeconomics and Economic Growth
okr.unit
Development Research Group (DECRG)
okr.volume
1 of 1

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