World Development Report 2009 : Reshaping Economic Geography

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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5995
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5996
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5997
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5998
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5999
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6000
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6001
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6002
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https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2124
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World Development Report
dc.contributor.author
World Bank
dc.date.accessioned
2012-04-06T19:46:30Z
dc.date.available
2012-04-06T19:46:30Z
dc.date.issued
2009
dc.description.abstract
Places do well when they promote transformations along the dimensions of economic geography: higher densities as cities grow; shorter distances as workers and businesses migrate closer to density; and fewer divisions as nations lower their economic borders and enter world markets to take advantage of scale and trade in specialized products. World Development Report 2009 concludes that the transformations along these three dimensions density, distance, and division are essential for development and should be encouraged. The conclusion is controversial. Slum-dwellers now number a billion, but the rush to cities continues. A billion people live in lagging areas of developing nations, remote from globalizations many benefits. And poverty and high mortality persist among the world’s bottom billion, trapped without access to global markets, even as others grow more prosperous and live ever longer lives. Concern for these three intersecting billions often comes with the prescription that growth must be spatially balanced. This report has a different message: economic growth will be unbalanced. To try to spread it out is to discourage it to fight prosperity, not poverty. But development can still be inclusive, even for people who start their lives distant from dense economic activity. For growth to be rapid and shared, governments must promote economic integration, the pivotal concept, as this report argues, in the policy debates on urbanization, territorial development, and regional integration. Instead, all three debates overemphasize place-based interventions. Reshaping Economic Geography reframes these debates to include all the instruments of integration spatially blind institutions, spatially connective infrastructure, and spatially targeted interventions. By calibrating the blend of these instruments, today’s developers can reshape their economic geography. If they do this well, their growth will still be unbalanced, but their development will be inclusive.
en
dc.identifier.isbn
978-0-8213-7607-2
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/5991
dc.language
English
dc.publisher
World Bank
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
decentralization
dc.subject
economic activity
dc.subject
economic concentration
dc.subject
economic geography
dc.subject
economic integration
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income
dc.subject
industrialization
dc.subject
inefficiency
dc.subject
mercantilism
dc.subject
per capita incomes
dc.title
World Development Report 2009
en
dc.title.subtitle
Reshaping Economic Geography
en
okr.crosscuttingsolutionarea
Public-Private Partnerships
okr.globalpractice
Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management
okr.globalpractice
Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience
okr.globalpractice
Transport and ICT
okr.globalpractice
Social Protection and Labor
okr.globalpractice
Finance and Markets
okr.globalpractice
Health, Nutrition, and Population
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/978-0-8213-7607-2
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.topic
Macroeconomics and Economic Growth
okr.topic
Transport
okr.topic
Health, Nutrition and Population
okr.topic
Private Sector Development
okr.topic
Communities and Human Settlements
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development
okr.volume
1 of 1

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