Journal Article

Health as a Family Matter : Do Intra-household Education Externalities Matter for Maternal and Child Health?

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collection.link.125
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/4401
collection.name.125
C. Journal articles published externally
dc.contributor.author
Lindelow, Magnus
dc.date.accessioned
2012-03-30T07:29:20Z
dc.date.available
2012-03-30T07:29:20Z
dc.date.issued
2008
dc.date.lastModified
2021-04-23T14:02:19Z
dc.description.abstract
This paper is concerned with the role of education as a determinant of health care choices. The central premise of the paper is that utilisation of health services is determined not solely by an individual's own education, but rather by a notion of effective education, which incorporates the educational attainment of other household members. The paper sets out a general framework for representing intra-household education externalities, and proposes a number of specific hypotheses concerning the way in which the education of different household members affects health care choices. These hypotheses are tested on data from Mozambique, focusing on maternity services, child immunisations, and child malnutrition. We draw four major conclusions from the analysis. First, while maternal education seems to be the education variable of primary importance for the health service and malnutrition variables under consideration, the education of other household members does have a significant and sometimes large effect. This is true not only for the spouse, but also the education of other individuals residing in the household. Second, the analysis suggests that while the education of the person (non-spouse) in the household with the highest level of education is important, the level of education of additional household members does not, as a rule, affect the use of services or child health outcomes. Third, the data provide no evidence of a gender difference in education externalities. Fourth, we examine the merits of two alternative representations of the education externality, but are unable to conclude unambiguously in favour of one specification over the other.
en
dc.identifier.citation
Journal of Development Studies
dc.identifier.issn
00220388
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/4708
dc.language.iso
EN
dc.relation.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.subject
Analysis of Health Care Markets I110
dc.subject
Health Production I120
dc.subject
Education and Research Institutions: General I200
dc.subject
Fertility
dc.subject
Family Planning
dc.subject
Child Care
dc.subject
INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS :: Children
dc.subject
Youth J130
dc.subject
Economics of Gender
dc.subject
Non-labor Discrimination J160
dc.subject
Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development O120
dc.subject
Economic Development: Human Resources
dc.subject
Human Development
dc.subject
Income Distribution
dc.subject
Migration O150
dc.title
Health as a Family Matter : Do Intra-household Education Externalities Matter for Maternal and Child Health?
en
dc.title.alternative
Journal of Development Studies
en
dc.type
Journal Article
en
okr.doctype
Journal Article
okr.externalcontent
External Content
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
1149
okr.journal.nbpages
562-585
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.region.country
Mozambique
okr.relation.associatedurl
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoh&AN=0982894&site=ehost-live
okr.relation.associatedurl
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00220388.asp
okr.volume
44

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