Poverty, Living Conditions, and Infrastructure Access : A Comparison of Slums in Dakar, Johannesburg, and Nairobi

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Gulyani, Sumila
en_US
dc.contributor.author
Talukdar, Debabrata
en_US
dc.contributor.author
Jack, Darby
en_US
dc.date.accessioned
2012-03-19T18:41:19Z
en_US
dc.date.available
2012-03-19T18:41:19Z
en_US
dc.date.issued
2010-07-01
en_US
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/3872
en_US
dc.description.abstract
In this paper the authors compare indicators of development, infrastructure, and living conditions in the slums of Dakar, Nairobi, and Johannesburg using data from 2004 World Bank surveys. Contrary to the notion that most African cities face similar slum problems, find that slums in the three cities differ dramatically from each other on nearly every indicator examined. Particularly striking is the weak correlation of measures of income and human capital with infrastructure access and quality of living conditions. For example, residents of Dakar's slums have low levels of education and high levels of poverty but fairly decent living conditions. By contrast, most of Nairobi's slum residents have jobs and comparatively high levels of education, but living conditions are but extremely bad . And in Johannesburg, education and unemployment levels are high, but living conditions are not as bad as in Nairobi. These findings suggest that reduction in income poverty and improvements in human development do not automatically translate into improved infrastructure access or living conditions. Since not all slum residents are poor, living conditions also vary within slums depending on poverty status. Compared to their non-poor neighbors, the poorest residents of Nairobi or Dakar are less likely to use water (although connection rates are similar) or have access to basic infrastructure (such as electricity or a mobile phone). Neighborhood location is also a powerful explanatory variable for electricity and water connections, even after controlling for household characteristics and poverty. Finally, tenants are less likely than homeowners to have water and electricity connections.
en_US
dc.language
English
en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research working paper ; no. WPS 5388
en_US
dc.rights
Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 3.0
en_US
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
en_US
dc.subject
ACCESS ROADS
en_US
dc.subject
ACCESS TO INFRASTRUCTURE
en_US
dc.subject
ACCESS TO SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
BASIC SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
BOTTLENECKS
en_US
dc.subject
BUS
en_US
dc.subject
CAR
en_US
dc.subject
CITIES
en_US
dc.subject
CLINICS
en_US
dc.subject
COLLECTION SYSTEM
en_US
dc.subject
CRIME
en_US
dc.subject
CRIMES
en_US
dc.subject
DEMOGRAPHICS
en_US
dc.subject
DISABLED PERSONS
en_US
dc.subject
DISPOSAL SYSTEM
en_US
dc.subject
DRAINAGE
en_US
dc.subject
DRINKING WATER
en_US
dc.subject
DWELLING
en_US
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT
en_US
dc.subject
FEMALE
en_US
dc.subject
FEMALES
en_US
dc.subject
GENDER
en_US
dc.subject
HOMEOWNERS
en_US
dc.subject
HOMES
en_US
dc.subject
HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES
en_US
dc.subject
HOUSEHOLDS
en_US
dc.subject
HOUSES
en_US
dc.subject
HOUSING
en_US
dc.subject
HOUSING UNITS
en_US
dc.subject
HUMAN CAPITAL
en_US
dc.subject
INFORMAL HOUSING
en_US
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE REFORM
en_US
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
INTERVENTIONS
en_US
dc.subject
LITERS PER CAPITA PER DAY
en_US
dc.subject
LITRES PER DAY
en_US
dc.subject
LIVING CONDITIONS
en_US
dc.subject
MODE OF TRANSPORT
en_US
dc.subject
MODE OF TRANSPORTATION
en_US
dc.subject
NEIGHBORHOOD
en_US
dc.subject
NEIGHBORHOODS
en_US
dc.subject
OCCUPANCY
en_US
dc.subject
PIT LATRINE
en_US
dc.subject
PRIVATE SCHOOL
en_US
dc.subject
PUBLIC TOILETS
en_US
dc.subject
PUBLIC TRANSIT
en_US
dc.subject
PUBLIC TRANSIT SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
PUBLIC TRANSPORT
en_US
dc.subject
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
en_US
dc.subject
ROAD
en_US
dc.subject
ROAD FACILITIES
en_US
dc.subject
ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE
en_US
dc.subject
ROAD SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
ROAD SYSTEMS
en_US
dc.subject
SAFETY
en_US
dc.subject
SANITATION
en_US
dc.subject
SCHOOLS
en_US
dc.subject
SEPTIC TANK
en_US
dc.subject
SERVICE DELIVERY
en_US
dc.subject
SETTLEMENT
en_US
dc.subject
SETTLEMENTS
en_US
dc.subject
SEWAGE DISPOSAL
en_US
dc.subject
SLUM
en_US
dc.subject
SLUM AREAS
en_US
dc.subject
SLUMS
en_US
dc.subject
SOCIAL SCIENCE
en_US
dc.subject
SOURCES OF WATER
en_US
dc.subject
SQUATTER
en_US
dc.subject
STREET LIGHTING
en_US
dc.subject
STREET LIGHTS
en_US
dc.subject
SUBSTANDARD HOUSING
en_US
dc.subject
TENANCY
en_US
dc.subject
TOILET FACILITIES
en_US
dc.subject
TOILET FACILITY
en_US
dc.subject
TRAINS
en_US
dc.subject
TRANSPORTATION
en_US
dc.subject
TRUE
en_US
dc.subject
URBAN AREAS
en_US
dc.subject
URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE
en_US
dc.subject
URBAN POOR
en_US
dc.subject
URBAN POVERTY
en_US
dc.subject
URBANIZATION
en_US
dc.subject
UTILITIES
en_US
dc.subject
UTILITY SERVICES
en_US
dc.subject
VEHICLES
en_US
dc.subject
WALKING
en_US
dc.subject
WASTE
en_US
dc.subject
WATER CONSUMPTION
en_US
dc.subject
WATER COVERAGE
en_US
dc.subject
WATER SOURCE
en_US
dc.subject
WATER SOURCES
en_US
dc.subject
WATER SUPPLY
en_US
dc.subject
WATER USE
en_US
dc.subject
WEALTH
en_US
dc.title
Poverty, Living Conditions, and Infrastructure Access : A Comparison of Slums in Dakar, Johannesburg, and Nairobi
en_US
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
000158349_20100728143906
en_US
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
12593673
en_US
okr.volume
1 of 1
en_US
okr.date.disclosure
2010-07-28
en_US
okr.topic
Water Supply and Sanitation :: Town Water Supply and Sanitation
en_US
okr.topic
Transport
en_US
okr.region.geographical
South Africa
en_US
okr.identifier.report
WPS5388
en_US
okr.unit
Development Research Group (DECRG)
en_US
okr.region.country
Senegal
en_US
okr.region.country
Kenya
en_US
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper
en_US
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
en_US
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes

Show simple item record



This item appears in the following Collection(s)