Working Paper

Association of Human Capital with Physical Growth from Birth to Adulthood : Evidence from the New Delhi Birth Cohort, India

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collection.link.221
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/12995
collection.name.221
Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Discussion Papers
dc.contributor.author
Sachdev, Harshpal Singh
dc.contributor.author
Kathuria, Ashi Kohli
dc.contributor.author
Sinha, Sikha
dc.contributor.author
Anand, Deepika
dc.contributor.author
Bhargava, Santosh K.
dc.date.accessioned
2020-08-13T21:08:58Z
dc.date.available
2020-08-13T21:08:58Z
dc.date.issued
2020-06
dc.date.lastModified
2020-10-28T10:03:52Z
dc.description.abstract
Undernutrition begins early in life and has lifelong consequences. The cost of undernutrition both for the individual and the economy are substantial. Analyzing data from an Indian cohort, the New Delhi Birth Cohort, formed between 1969 and 1972, this paper provides evidence on the associations between attained human capital in the third and fourth decade of life and measures of growth from birth to adulthood. For the purpose of this paper, attained human capital is defined through three metrics: educational status, male occupation, and material possession score. Growth measures (height, weight, body mass index (BMI)) during five age intervals (0 to 6 months, 6 to 24 months, 2 to 5 years, 5 to 11 years, and 11 years to adulthood) were related to human capital metrics using multivariate regression models. Sensitivity analyses were also performed to assess the stability of associations. All three human capital metrics had a significant positive association with birth size and measures of physical growth in children under-five years of age, in particular for children under two years. Length at birth and height gain from 6 to 24 months were consistently associated with all metrics. Faster weight and BMI gain from five years onward significantly predicted material possession scores. Among socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics at birth, maternal and paternal education, and paternal occupation also had a consistent positive association with all three human capital metrics. The findings reinforce the focus on interventions during the first 1,000 days of life to promote larger birth size and linear growth and suggest an additional window of opportunity between 2 to 5 years to improve human capital. The benefits can be enhanced by simultaneous investments in parental (especially maternal) literacy, livelihoods, safe water supply and sanitation, access to health care, and enhancing incomes. These interventions also have a nutrition-sensitive effect to promote early life growth.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/212721596523665354/Association-of-Human-Capital-with-Physical-Growth-from-Birth-to-Adulthood-Evidence-from-the-New-Delhi-Birth-Cohort-India
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/34362
dc.language
English
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Health, Nutrition and Population Discussion Paper;
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
HUMAN CAPITAL
dc.subject
STUNTING
dc.subject
NUTRITION
dc.subject
INTERGENERATIONAL
dc.title
Association of Human Capital with Physical Growth from Birth to Adulthood
en
dc.title.subtitle
Evidence from the New Delhi Birth Cohort, India
en
dc.type
Working Paper
en
okr.crossref.title
Association of Human Capital with Physical Growth from Birth to Adulthood
okr.date.disclosure
2020-08-03
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Working Paper
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/212721596523665354/Association-of-Human-Capital-with-Physical-Growth-from-Birth-to-Adulthood-Evidence-from-the-New-Delhi-Birth-Cohort-India
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
090224b087c7b32c_2_0
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
32298110
okr.identifier.report
151396
okr.imported
true
en
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/212721596523665354/pdf/Association-of-Human-Capital-with-Physical-Growth-from-Birth-to-Adulthood-Evidence-from-the-New-Delhi-Birth-Cohort-India.pdf
en
okr.region.administrative
South Asia
okr.region.country
India
okr.topic
Health, Nutrition and Population :: Health Indicators
okr.topic
Health, Nutrition and Population :: Nutrition
okr.unit
Health Nutri & Population SAR 1 (HSAHN)

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