Policy Note

The COVID-19 Pandemic : Shocks to Education and Policy Responses

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collection.link.130
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5995
collection.link.137
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6002
collection.link.214
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/11872
collection.name.130
French PDFs Available
collection.name.137
Spanish PDFs Available
collection.name.214
Policy Notes
dc.contributor.author
World Bank
dc.date.accessioned
2020-05-05T13:40:09Z
dc.date.available
2020-05-05T13:40:09Z
dc.date.issued
2020-05-07
dc.date.lastModified
2021-05-25T09:37:04Z
dc.description.abstract
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the world was living a learning crisis. Before the pandemic, 258 million children and youth of primary- and secondary-school age were out of school. And low schooling quality meant many who were in school learned too little. The Learning Poverty rate in low-and middle-income countries was 53 percent—meaning that over half of all 10-year-old children couldn't read and understand a simple age appropriate story. Even worse, the crisis was not equally distributed: the most disadvantaged children and youth had the worst access to schooling, highest dropout rates, and the largest learning deficits. All this means that the world was already far off track for meeting Sustainable Development Goal 4, which commits all nations to ensure that, among other ambitious targets, “all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education.” The COVID-19 pandemic now threatens to make education outcomes even worse. The pandemic has already had profound impacts on education by closing schools almost everywhere in the planet, in the largest simultaneous shock to all education systems in our lifetimes. The damage will become even more severe as the health emergency translates into a deep global recession. These costs of crisis are described below. But it is possible to counter those shocks, and to turn crisis into opportunity. The first step is to cope successfully with the school closures, by protecting health and safety and doing what they can to prevent students' learning loss using remote learning. At the same time, countries need to start planning for school reopening. That means preventing dropout, ensuring healthy school conditions, and using new techniques to promote rapid learning recovery in key areas once students are back in school. As the school system stabilizes, countries can use the focus and innovativeness of the recovery period to “build back better.” The key: don't replicate the failures of the pre-COVID systems, but instead build toward improved systems and accelerated learning for all students.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/365801588601466966/The-COVID-19-Pandemic-Shocks-to-Education-and-Policy-Responses
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/33696
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
COVID-19
dc.subject
CORONAVIRUS
dc.subject
PANDEMIC RESPONSE
dc.subject
EDUCATION
dc.subject
LEARNING POVERTY
dc.subject
DROPOUT RATE
dc.subject
EDUCATION QUALITY
dc.subject
SCHOOL CLOSURE
dc.subject
LEARNING LOSS
dc.subject
EDUCATION SYSTEM
dc.subject
DISTANCE EDUCATION
dc.subject
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
dc.title
The COVID-19 Pandemic
en
dc.title.subtitle
Shocks to Education and Policy Responses
en
dc.type
Policy Note
en
okr.crossref.title
The COVID-19 Pandemic
okr.date.disclosure
2020-05-07
okr.doctype
Economic & Sector Work
okr.doctype
Economic & Sector Work :: Policy Note
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/33696
okr.identifier.report
148198
okr.language.supported
en
okr.language.supported
fr
okr.language.supported
es
okr.topic
Education :: Access & Equity in Basic Education
okr.topic
Education :: Education For All
okr.topic
Education :: Educational Institutions & Facilities
okr.topic
Education :: Educational Technology and Distance Education
okr.topic
Education :: Effective Schools and Teachers
okr.unit
Education Global Practice

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