Working Paper

Migration and Urbanization in Post-Apartheid South Africa

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collection.link.5
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/9
collection.name.5
Policy Research Working Papers
dc.contributor.author
Bakker, Jan David
dc.contributor.author
Parsons, Christopher
dc.contributor.author
Rauch, Ferdinand
dc.date.accessioned
2019-03-07T19:45:33Z
dc.date.available
2019-03-07T19:45:33Z
dc.date.issued
2019-03
dc.date.lastModified
2022-01-24T12:20:54Z
dc.description.abstract
Although Africa has experienced rapid urbanization in recent decades, we know little about the process of urbanization across the continent. The paper exploits a natural experiment, the abolition of South African pass laws, to explore how exogenous population shocks affect the spatial distribution of economic activity. Under apartheid, black South Africans were severely restricted in their choice of location and many were forced to live in homelands. Following the abolition of apartheid they were free to migrate. Given a migration cost in distance, a town nearer to the homelands will receive a larger inflow of people than a more distant town following the removal of mobility restrictions. Drawing upon this exogenous variation, the authors study the effect of migration on urbanization in South Africa. While they find that on average there is no endogenous adjustment of population location to a positive population shock, there is heterogeneity in these results. Cities that start off larger do grow endogenously in the wake of a migration shock, while rural areas that start off small do not respond in the same way. This heterogeneity indicates that population shocks lead to an increase in urban relative to rural populations. Overall, the evidence suggests that exogenous migration shocks can foster urbanization in the medium run.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/825741551797546879/Migration-and-Urbanization-in-Post-Apartheid-South-Africa
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/31358
dc.language
English
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research working paper,no. WPS 8764;
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research Working Paper;No. 8764
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
URBANIZATION
dc.subject
MIGRATION
dc.subject
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
dc.subject
NATURAL EXPERIMENT
dc.subject
BLACK POPULATION
dc.subject
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION
dc.subject
CENSUS
dc.subject
ABOLITION
dc.subject
LABOR MOBILITY
dc.title
Migration and Urbanization in Post-Apartheid South Africa
en
dc.type
Working Paper
en
okr.associatedcontent
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/36721 Journal article
okr.crossref.title
Migration and Urbanization in Post-Apartheid South Africa
okr.date.disclosure
2019-03-05
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/825741551797546879/Migration-and-Urbanization-in-Post-Apartheid-South-Africa
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/1813-9450-8764
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
090224b086a1de2d_1_0
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
30879283
okr.identifier.report
WPS8764
okr.imported
true
en
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/825741551797546879/pdf/WPS8764.pdf
en
okr.region.administrative
Africa
okr.region.country
South Africa
okr.statistics.combined
1057
okr.statistics.dr
825741551797546879
okr.topic
Health, Nutrition and Population :: Demographics
okr.topic
Poverty Reduction :: Migration and Development
okr.topic
Urban Development :: National Urban Development Policies & Strategies
okr.topic
Urban Development :: Urban Economic Development
okr.topic
Urban Development :: Urban Housing
okr.unit
Strategy and Operations Team, Development Economics Vice Presidency

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