Report

Building Back Better : Achieving Resilience through Stronger, Faster, and More Inclusive Post-Disaster Reconstruction

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collection.link.147
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/7755
collection.name.147
Risk and Vulnerability Assessment
dc.contributor.author
Hallegatte, Stéphane
dc.contributor.author
Rentschler, Jun
dc.contributor.author
Walsh, Brian
dc.date.accessioned
2018-06-14T19:37:00Z
dc.date.available
2018-06-14T19:37:00Z
dc.date.issued
2018-06-18
dc.description.abstract
The 2017 Unbreakable report made the case that disaster losses disproportionately affect poor people. The Caribbean hurricane season of 2017 was a tragic illustration of this. Two category 5 hurricanes wreaked destruction on numerous small islands, causing severe damages on islands like Barbuda, Dominica, and Saint Martin. The human cost of these disasters was immense, and the impact of this devastation was felt most strongly by poorer communities in the path of the storms. And yet, amidst the destruction it is essential to look forward and to build back better. In this 2018 report the authors explore how countries can strengthen their resilience to natural shocks through a better reconstruction process. Reconstruction needs to be strong, so that assets and livelihoods become less vulnerable to future shocks; fast, so that people can get back to their normal life as early as possible; and inclusive, so that nobody is left behind in the recovery process. The benefits of building back better could be very large – up to US$173 billion per year globally – and would be greatest among the communities and countries that are hit by disasters most intensely and frequently and that have limited coverage of social protection and financial inclusion. Small island states – because of their size, exposure, and vulnerability – are among the countries where building back better has the greatest potential. A stronger, faster, and more inclusive recovery would lead to an average reduction in disaster-related well-being losses of 59 percent in the 17 small island states covered in the report.
en
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/29867
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
NATURAL DISASTERS
dc.subject
SMALL ISLAND STATES
dc.subject
ASSET LOSS
dc.subject
CLIMATE CHANGE
dc.subject
CLIMATE IMPACT
dc.subject
INVESTMENT NEED
dc.subject
VULNERABILITY
dc.subject
TRANSPORT
dc.subject
ACCESS TO SERVICES
dc.subject
SOCIAL PROTECTION
dc.subject
INFRASTRUCTURE
dc.subject
DISASTER RECOVERY
dc.subject
CLIMATE RESILIENCE
dc.subject
HOUSING
dc.subject
RECONSTRUCTION
dc.subject
SOCIAL SAFETY NETS
dc.title
Building Back Better
en
dc.title.subtitle
Achieving Resilience through Stronger, Faster, and More Inclusive Post-Disaster Reconstruction
en
dc.type
Report
en
okr.associatedcontent
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/25335 Unbreakable
okr.date.disclosure
2018-06-18
okr.doctype
Economic & Sector Work
okr.doctype
Economic & Sector Work :: Risk and Vulnerability Assessment
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.report
127215
okr.language.supported
en
okr.topic
Environment :: Climate Change Impacts
okr.topic
Environment :: Climate Change and Environment
okr.topic
Environment :: Natural Disasters
okr.topic
Infrastructure Economics and Finance :: Infrastructure Finance
okr.topic
Poverty Reduction :: Poverty, Environment and Development
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Safety Nets and Transfers
okr.unit
Climate Change-D1-GFDRR-IBRD

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