Brief

Are Cash Transfers Better Chunky or Smooth? : Evidence from an Impact Evaluation of a Cash Transfer Program in Northern Nigeria

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collection.link.307
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/25446
collection.name.307
Africa Gender Policy Briefs
dc.contributor.author
Bastian, Gautam
dc.contributor.author
Goldstein, Markus
dc.contributor.author
Papineni, Sreelakshmi
dc.date.accessioned
2017-10-03T16:53:45Z
dc.date.available
2017-10-03T16:53:45Z
dc.date.issued
2017
dc.date.lastModified
2021-05-25T10:54:35Z
dc.description.abstract
Women receiving unconditional cash transfers in northern Nigeria worked more, particularly, in their own businesses, spent more on consumption, were more food secure, saved more, bought more animals and improved their housing compared to the women in the control group. Quarterly transfers cost half as much as monthly transfers to administer, but there is no difference in outcomes. Women’s ability to control the cash transfers is the same under a quarterly payment scheme and monthly payment scheme. Women use cash transfers to increase investment in their own business activities. Cash transfer recipients were not only more likely to be involved in their own non-farm business but they also spent more on business inputs and increased their business profits. Their husbands remained active farmers and didn’t change their business activities. The lab aims to do this by producing and delivering a new body of evidence and developing a compelling narrative, geared towards policymakers, on what works and what does not work in promoting gender equality.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/201411503985884102/Are-cash-transfers-better-chunky-or-smooth-evidence-from-an-impact-evaluation-of-a-cash-transfer-program-in-northern-Nigeria
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/28434
dc.language
English
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Gender Innovation Lab Policy Brief;No. 21
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
CASH TRANSFERS
dc.subject
GENDER
dc.subject
CONSUMPTION
dc.subject
INVESTMENT
dc.subject
BARGAINING POWER
dc.subject
WELL-BEING
dc.subject
WOMEN AND AGRICULTURE
dc.subject
GENDER INNOVATION LAB
dc.subject
AFRICA GENDER POLICY
dc.title
Are Cash Transfers Better Chunky or Smooth?
en
dc.title.subtitle
Evidence from an Impact Evaluation of a Cash Transfer Program in Northern Nigeria
en
dc.type
Brief
en
okr.date.disclosure
2017-08-29
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Brief
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/201411503985884102/Are-cash-transfers-better-chunky-or-smooth-evidence-from-an-impact-evaluation-of-a-cash-transfer-program-in-northern-Nigeria
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/28434
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
090224b084f25f65_1_0
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
27939446
okr.identifier.report
119101
okr.imported
true
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/201411503985884102/pdf/119101-BRI-ADD-SERIES-GILNigeriaCashTransfersBriefv-PUBLIC.pdf
en
okr.region.administrative
Africa
okr.region.country
Nigeria
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Economic Policy
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Poverty
okr.topic
Poverty Reduction :: Conditional Cash Transfers
okr.topic
Poverty Reduction :: Services & Transfers to Poor
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Safety Nets and Transfers
okr.unit
Gender Impact Evaluation (AFRGI)

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