Journal Article

Promoting Women's Economic Empowerment : What Works?

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collection.link.103
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2212
collection.name.103
B. World Bank Research Observer
dc.contributor.author
Buvinić, Mayra
dc.contributor.author
Furst-Nichols, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned
2017-08-09T21:51:44Z
dc.date.available
2017-08-09T21:51:44Z
dc.date.issued
2016-02
dc.date.lastModified
2021-05-26T09:05:19Z
dc.description.abstract
A review of rigorous evaluations of interventions that seek to empower women economically shows that the same class of interventions has significantly different outcomes depending on the client. Capital alone, as a small cash loan or grant, is not sufficient to grow women-owned subsistence-level firms. However, it can work if it is delivered in-kind to more successful women microentrepreneurs, and it should boost the performance of women's larger-sized SMEs. Very poor women need a more intensive package of services than do less poor women to break out of subsistence production and grow their businesses. What works for young women does not necessarily work for adult women. Skills training, job search assistance, internships, and wage subsidies increase the employment levels of adult women but do not raise wages. However, similar interventions increase young women's employability and earnings if social restrictions are not binding. Women who run subsistence-level firms face additional social constraints when compared to similar men, thus explaining the differences in the outcomes of some loans, grants, and training interventions that favor men. Social constraints may also play a role in explaining women's outcome gains that are short-lasting or emerge with a delay. The good news is that many of the additional constraints that women face can be overcome by simple, inexpensive adjustments in program design that lessen family and social pressures. These include providing capital in-kind or transacted through the privacy of a mobile phone and providing secure savings accounts to nudge women to keep the money in the business rather than to divert it to non-business uses.
en
dc.identifier.citation
World Bank Research Observer
dc.identifier.issn
1564-6971
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/27699
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the World Bank
dc.rights
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo
dc.subject
EMPOWERMENT
dc.subject
WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS
dc.subject
MICROENTERPRISE
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
EMPLOYABILITY
dc.subject
SOCIAL CONSTRAINTS
dc.subject
SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISE
dc.title
Promoting Women's Economic Empowerment
en
dc.title.subtitle
What Works?
en
dc.type
Journal Article
en
okr.date.disclosure
2017-08-09
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Journal Article
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1093/wbro/lku013
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/27699
okr.journal.nbpages
59-101
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.region.administrative
Africa
okr.region.country
Mauritania
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development :: Microfinance
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Economic Policy
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Poverty
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Social Development
okr.topic
Private Sector Development :: Microenterprises
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Markets
okr.volume
31(1)

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