Brief

Financing Options for the 2030 Water Agenda

Show simple item record

collection.link.157
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/9388
collection.name.157
Miscellaneous Knowledge Notes
dc.contributor.author
Kolker, Joel Evan
dc.contributor.author
Kingdom, Bill
dc.contributor.author
Trémolet, Sophie
dc.contributor.author
Winpenny, James
dc.contributor.author
Cardone, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned
2016-11-30T17:56:17Z
dc.date.available
2016-11-30T17:56:17Z
dc.date.issued
2016-11
dc.description.abstract
The sector is in the process of repositioning itself toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Under the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the international focus of the water sector was predominantly on increasing access to water supply and sanitation (WSS). With the advent of the SDGs the agenda is much broader covering all aspects of water, water resource management, and irrigation and theirsustainability. The water sector is not well equipped to face these new financing challenges. The sector has historically relied on public financing to meet its investment needs—through domestic and development partner concessional funds and/or lending. Institutionally many parts of the sector are government departments where mobilizing private finance is almost non-existent. Even when they are established as corporate entities, such as some WSS providers, it is rare for them to borrow from commercial lenders due to weak incentives and/or poor creditworthiness. Mobilizing additional concessional funds will help— but will not be sufficient. New sources of concessional finance might be tapped (e.g., climate finance) but the gap cannot be filled simply by increasing the volume of concessional funds and lending from governments or development partners. A new sector financing paradigm is required based on four broad themes. The sector has to realign itself around actions that (a) improve sector governance and efficiency (i.e., improving creditworthiness), (b) crowd in or blend private finance (i.e., leveraging capital ), (c) allocate sector resources more effectively to deliver the maximum benefit for every dollar invested (i.e., targeting capital), and (d) improve sector capital planning to reduce unit capital costs (i.e., minimizing capital requirements). Achieving the new financing paradigm requires a more collaborative approach with all stakeholders playing an active role.
en
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/25495
dc.language
English
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Water Global Practice Knowledge Brief;
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subject
water
dc.subject
SDGs
dc.subject
Sustainable Development Goals
dc.subject
water supply
dc.subject
sanitation
dc.subject
access to finance
dc.subject
sustainable financing
dc.subject
development finance
dc.subject
governance
dc.subject
private finance
dc.title
Financing Options for the 2030 Water Agenda
en
dc.type
Brief
en
okr.date.disclosure
2016-11-29
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Brief
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/846161480490614367/Financing-options-for-the-2030-water-agenda
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
090224b084758e5f_1_0
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
26983355
okr.identifier.report
110619
okr.imported
true
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/846161480490614367/pdf/110619-BRI-PUBLIC-ADD-SERIES-Water-global-practive-knowledge-brief.pdf
en
okr.topic
Water Supply and Sanitation :: Water Supply and Sanitation Finance
okr.unit
Water Global Programs (GWAGP)

Show simple item record



This item appears in the following Collection(s)