Book

Understanding Gender in Maldives : Toward Inclusive Development

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collection.link.38
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2146
collection.name.38
Directions in Development
dc.contributor.author
El-Horr, Jana
dc.contributor.author
Pande, Rohini Prabha
dc.date.accessioned
2016-04-25T15:56:28Z
dc.date.available
2016-04-25T15:56:28Z
dc.date.issued
2016-05-08
dc.description.abstract
Within the past decade the Maldives moved from poverty to middle-income status, introduced democracy, and was hailed as a Millennium Development Goal Plus country. Women face little discrimination in basic aspects of life such as primary education, health and survival – unlike in much of South Asia. This economic and social progress has yet to be fully inclusive, however, and gender inequality endures, despite constitutional guarantees to the contrary. This is at least partly due to a shift in the nature of Islamic practice in the Maldives towards more rigidly patriarchal interpretations. Women’s labor force participation is high, but limited to lower echelons of the economy. Women are slightly more likely than men to be unemployed. Despite gender-equal primary schooling, girls’ access to tertiary and professional education is hampered by beliefs about girls’ and women’s mobility, and primacy of household roles over others. Within the home, women face challenges that men do not, such as high risks of domestic violence and little control over household assets. Finally, women have limited presence in politics and governance. Men struggle with different gendered situations. Unemployment is high among young men, who also increasingly are alienated from society and family. This alienation, combined with a lack of strong alternative social structures to replace the breakdown of traditional family structures that has accompanied Maldives’ development trajectory, appear to be propelling young men towards greater social conservatism, participation in gangs, drug use and violence. Nonetheless, women are more disadvantaged in more realms of life than are men. Moreover, public support for gender equality and women’s rights appears to be declining. These developments are worrying for the future of gender equality in the Maldives, as well as for a more inclusive development model that would offer opportunities to both men and women.
en
dc.identifier.isbn
978-1-4648-0868-5
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/24118
dc.language
English
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
Washington, DC: World Bank
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Directions in Development--Countries and Regions;
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subject
GENDER
dc.subject
MALDIVES
dc.subject
YOUTH
dc.subject
DEVELOPMENT
dc.subject
PRIVATE SPHERE
dc.subject
PUBLIC SPHERE
dc.subject
INEQUALITY
dc.subject
MASCULINITY
dc.subject
WOMEN
dc.subject
UNEMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
FAMILY
dc.subject
INCLUSION
dc.title
Understanding Gender in Maldives
en
dc.title.subtitle
Toward Inclusive Development
dc.type
Book
okr.date.disclosure
2016-05-08
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Publication
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/978-1-4648-0868-5
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
210868
okr.identifier.report
105635
okr.imported
true
okr.language.supported
en
okr.region.administrative
South Asia
okr.region.country
Maldives
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Development
okr.topic
Social Development :: Social Inclusion & Institutions
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Health
okr.topic
Gender :: Gender and Education
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Policies
okr.unit
GSU06

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