Technical Paper

Emissions Trading in Practice : A Handbook on Design and Implementation

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collection.link.133
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/5998
collection.link.137
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6002
collection.link.138
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/6003
collection.link.278
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/21357
collection.link.309
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/27009
collection.name.133
Chinese PDFs Available
collection.name.137
Spanish PDFs Available
collection.name.138
Turkish PDFs Available
collection.name.278
Partnership for Market Readiness Technical Papers
collection.name.309
Ukrainian PDFs Available
dc.contributor.author
Partnership for Market Readiness
en_US
dc.contributor.author
International Carbon Action Partnership
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dc.date.accessioned
2016-03-07T18:21:18Z
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dc.date.available
2016-03-07T18:21:18Z
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dc.date.issued
2016-03-07
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dc.description.abstract
As the world moves on from the climate agreement negotiated in Paris, attention is turning from the identification of emissions reduction trajectories—in the form of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)—to crucial questions about how these emissions reductions are to be delivered and reported within the future international accounting framework. The experience to date shows that, if well designed, emissions trading systems (ETS) can be an effective, credible, and transparent tool for helping to achieve low-cost emissions reductions in ways that mobilize private sector actors, attract investment, and encourage international cooperation. However, to maximize effectiveness, any ETS needs to be designed in a way that is appropriate to its context. This Handbook is intended to help decision makers, policy practitioners, and stakeholders achieve this goal. It explains the rationale for an ETS, and sets out a 10-step process for designing an ETS – each step involves a series of decisions or actions that will shape major features of the policy. In doing so, it draws both on conceptual analysis and on some of the most important practical lessons learned to date from implementing ETSs around the world, including from the European Union, several provinces and cities in China, California and Québec, the Northeastern United States, Alberta, New Zealand, Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, Tokyo, and Saitama.
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dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/23874
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dc.language.iso
en_US
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
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dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
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dc.rights.holder
World Bank
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dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
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dc.subject
carbon trading
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dc.subject
climate change
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dc.subject
carbon emissions
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dc.subject
carbon tax
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dc.subject
Emissions Trading System
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dc.subject
ETS
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dc.title
Emissions Trading in Practice
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dc.title.subtitle
A Handbook on Design and Implementation
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dc.type
Technical Paper
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okr.date.disclosure
2016-03-07
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okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Working Paper
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okr.doctype
Publications & Research
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okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.topic
Environment :: Carbon Policy and Trading
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okr.topic
Environment :: Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases
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okr.topic
Macroeconomics and Economic Growth :: Climate Change Economics
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okr.unit
Climate and Carbon Finance Unit
en_US

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