Working Paper

How Does the Short-Term Training Program Contribute to Skills Development in Bangladesh? : A Tracer Study of the Short-Term Training Graduates

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collection.link.248
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/16283
collection.name.248
South Asia Human Development Sector Discussion Papers
dc.contributor.author
World Bank
dc.date.accessioned
2016-03-02T17:47:17Z
dc.date.available
2016-03-02T17:47:17Z
dc.date.issued
2015-09
dc.date.lastModified
2021-04-23T14:04:17Z
dc.description.abstract
Skills development is one of the priorities for national economic development strategies of Bangladesh. The vision 2021 of the Government of Bangladesh gives the highest priority to building a large base of skilled workers in order to achieve a poverty-free middle-income country by 2021. The skills development sector is highly complex due to multiple service providers, a vast spectrum of target audiences, a large range in modalities of service provision, and varied emphases in terms of skills levels and types. The short-term training, a formal channel of six months training, is an important instrument for bridging the gap between the needs of the labor market for increasing the pool of skillful workers and the aspiration of the students for finding a good job. In order to assess the performance of short-term training and interventions by Skills and Training Enhancement Project (STEP), a tracer study was conducted between December 2013 and January 2014. Skills and Training Enhancement Project (STEP) is jointly financed by the World Bank, Canada and the Government of Bangladesh (GoB), which started in 2010 for contributing to Bangladesh’s medium to long-term objective of developing its human resources as a cornerstone of its strategy for poverty alleviation and economic growth. It supports competitively selected 42 public and 8 private short-term training institutions for improving the quality of training and providing opportunities to the disadvantaged youth for obtaining skills from the select training providers.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2016/02/25869429/short-term-training-program-contribute-skills-development-bangladesh-tracer-study-short-term-training-graduates
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/23814
dc.language
English
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
South Asia Region, Education Global Practice discussion paper;
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subject
JOBS
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
PRIVATE TRAINING INSTITUTIONS
dc.subject
UNIVERSITY DEGREE
dc.subject
UNEMPLOYMENT RATES
dc.subject
COLLEGE
dc.subject
TEACHERS
dc.subject
PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP
dc.subject
SKILLED WORKERS
dc.subject
TRAINING PROVIDERS
dc.subject
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
dc.subject
GLOBAL LABOR MARKET
dc.subject
LABOR MARKET NEEDS
dc.subject
TUITION
dc.subject
EQUITABLE ACCESS
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
dc.subject
TRAINING INSTITUTIONS
dc.subject
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
dc.subject
AGE GROUP
dc.subject
LEVELS OF EDUCATION
dc.subject
LABOR FORCE
dc.subject
FEMALE PARTICIPATION
dc.subject
HIGHER EDUCATION
dc.subject
CAREER
dc.subject
JOB
dc.subject
PAPERS
dc.subject
EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS
dc.subject
LABOR MARKET DEMAND
dc.subject
PUBLIC TRAINING
dc.subject
TECHNICAL SKILLS
dc.subject
COMPUTER TRAINING
dc.subject
JOB PLACEMENT SERVICE
dc.subject
TRAINING PROGRAMS
dc.subject
LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION
dc.subject
PRIVATE TRAINING
dc.subject
HIGHER TUITION
dc.subject
TRAINING COURSE
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES
dc.subject
YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT RATE
dc.subject
JOB SEEKERS
dc.subject
LITERACY
dc.subject
WORK EXPERIENCE
dc.subject
TEXTBOOKS
dc.subject
EDUCATION SECTOR
dc.subject
PRODUCTION PROCESS
dc.subject
TECHNICAL TRAINING
dc.subject
FUTURE STUDENTS
dc.subject
LABOR MARKET
dc.subject
TRAINING
dc.subject
TEACHER TRAINING
dc.subject
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
dc.subject
PRIVATE SCHOOLS
dc.subject
GRADUATE
dc.subject
TRAINING QUALITY
dc.subject
SHORT- TERM TRAINING
dc.subject
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
dc.subject
UNEMPLOYED
dc.subject
MINISTRIES
dc.subject
STUDENT SATISFACTION
dc.subject
LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
dc.subject
JOB EXPERIENCE
dc.subject
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
dc.subject
LEARNING
dc.subject
GRADUATES
dc.subject
RESEARCH
dc.subject
LABOR
dc.subject
TEACHING
dc.subject
JOB SEARCH
dc.subject
QUALITY OF TEACHING
dc.subject
EDUCATED PEOPLE
dc.subject
FURTHER EDUCATION
dc.subject
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
dc.subject
PERSONAL NETWORKS
dc.subject
FEMALE LABOR
dc.subject
UNEMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
TRAINING FACILITIES
dc.subject
VOCATIONAL TRAINING
dc.subject
ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
dc.subject
SHORT-TERM TRAINING
dc.subject
WORKERS
dc.subject
TRAINING COURSES
dc.subject
SKILLS TRAINING
dc.subject
GLOBAL MARKET
dc.subject
POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS
dc.subject
SCIENCE
dc.subject
UNEMPLOYMENT RATE
dc.subject
TUITION FEES
dc.subject
STUDENT
dc.subject
SCHOOLS
dc.subject
LABOR DEMAND
dc.subject
DISADVANTAGED YOUTH
dc.subject
QUALIFIED STUDENTS
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT STATUS
dc.subject
EXPENDITURES
dc.subject
LABOR MARKET OUTCOMES
dc.subject
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
dc.subject
WAGE RATE
dc.subject
FORMAL TRAINING PROGRAMS
dc.subject
DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS
dc.subject
TRAINING CENTER
dc.subject
PRIOR WORK EXPERIENCE
dc.subject
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
dc.subject
CURRICULUM
dc.subject
TEACHER
dc.subject
MANPOWER
dc.subject
VOCATIONAL TRAINING COURSES
dc.subject
FEMALE STUDENTS
dc.subject
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
dc.subject
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
dc.subject
JOB FAIRS
dc.subject
INSTITUTES
dc.subject
PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS
dc.subject
HUMAN RESOURCES
dc.subject
CAREER COUNSELING
dc.subject
SKILL LEVELS
dc.subject
FEMALE LABOR FORCE
dc.subject
TRAINING PROGRAM
dc.subject
JOB PLACEMENT
dc.subject
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
dc.subject
WORKING STUDENTS
dc.subject
ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS
dc.subject
UNIVERSITY
dc.subject
STUDENTS
dc.subject
LOCAL LABOR MARKET
dc.subject
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
dc.subject
QUALITY ASSURANCE
dc.subject
DEGREES
dc.subject
YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
CONTINUING EDUCATION
dc.subject
JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES
dc.subject
SCHOOL
dc.subject
EMPLOYED GRADUATES
dc.subject
SECONDARY EDUCATION
dc.subject
WAGE EMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
FINDING EMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
SERVICE PROVIDERS
dc.subject
EMPLOYEES
dc.title
How Does the Short-Term Training Program Contribute to Skills Development in Bangladesh?
en
dc.title.subtitle
A Tracer Study of the Short-Term Training Graduates
en
dc.type
Working Paper
en
okr.date.disclosure
2016-02-03
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Working Paper
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2016/02/25869429/short-term-training-program-contribute-skills-development-bangladesh-tracer-study-short-term-training-graduates
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
090224b084142c3b_1_0
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
25869429
okr.identifier.report
103117
okr.imported
true
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2016/02/03/090224b084142c3b/1_0/Rendered/PDF/How0does0the0s0m0training0graduates.pdf
en
okr.region.administrative
South Asia
okr.region.country
Bangladesh
okr.sector
Education
okr.theme
Human development :: Education for the knowledge economy
okr.theme
Trade and integration :: Export development and competitiveness
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Skills Development and Labor Force Training
okr.topic
Education :: Tertiary Education
okr.topic
Education :: Effective Schools and Teachers
okr.topic
Education :: Secondary Education
okr.unit
Education - GP (GEDDR)

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