The Sao Mateus–Jabaquara Trolleybusway Concession in Brazil

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collection.link.5
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/9
collection.name.5
Policy Research Working Papers
dc.contributor.author
Rebelo, Jorge
dc.contributor.author
Machado, Pedro
dc.date.accessioned
2015-02-23T23:15:10Z
dc.date.available
2015-02-23T23:15:10Z
dc.date.issued
2000-05
dc.date.lastModified
2021-04-23T14:04:02Z
dc.description.abstract
The authors describe how Sao Paulo State granted a 20-year concession for operating a busway, one requirement for which was that the concessionaire replace the diesel bus operation with electric traction (trolleys). This was not a "greenfield concession" but is probably the only "busway" concession undertaken so far worldwide. With roughly 16,000 buses fighting their way through heavy traffic under traffic policies geared to automobiles, bus services was slow and unreliable. Then Sao Paulo adopted certain practices aimed at improving bus operations. Between 1983 and 1987, it implemented a segregated trolleybus corridor between Sao Mateus and Jabaquara, to be opened as a private concession regulated by the state of Sao Paulo. The concession was to operate for 20 years but the winning consortium had to invest in only part of the equipment, because part of it was in place. This made things less risky for the private consortium and allowed the state to complete an environmentally friendly project with the help of the private sector. The concession has so far been a success - an example to be followed. After an initial increase, demand for the busway began to fall in 1998 and 1999. This was part of a general decline in demand for the bus system because of: a) A drop in jobs resulting from the economic slowdown. b) A growth in the use of automobiles. c) Competition from illegal buses (vans), which offer door-to-door service. The state was late in completing the aerial network for the trolleyway and rehabilitating sections of the roadway. This delayed replacement of diesel buses by trolleybuses. State representatives indicated it might be better in future to find a mechanism through which the concessionaire instead of the state would undertake infrastructure works and would also handle administration of integration terminals.
en
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/21480
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research Working Paper;No. 2353
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
acceleration
dc.subject
accessibility
dc.subject
arterial streets
dc.subject
automobiles
dc.subject
bus fleet
dc.subject
bus lanes
dc.subject
bus lines
dc.subject
bus operation
dc.subject
bus operations
dc.subject
bus passengers
dc.subject
bus routes
dc.subject
bus service
dc.subject
bus services
dc.subject
bus stops
dc.subject
bus system
dc.subject
buses
dc.subject
busways
dc.subject
commercial speed
dc.subject
concession contract
dc.subject
concession law
dc.subject
concession period
dc.subject
concessionaire
dc.subject
concessions
dc.subject
congestion
dc.subject
conventional bus
dc.subject
corridor
dc.subject
deceleration
dc.subject
diesel
dc.subject
diesel bus
dc.subject
diesel vehicles
dc.subject
electric trolleybuses
dc.subject
fare revenues
dc.subject
fares
dc.subject
feeder lines
dc.subject
freight
dc.subject
grade
dc.subject
grade separation
dc.subject
headway
dc.subject
heavy traffic
dc.subject
informal transport
dc.subject
internal rate of return
dc.subject
intersections
dc.subject
Metro Company
dc.subject
Metropolitan Transport
dc.subject
motorization rate
dc.subject
net present value
dc.subject
noise
dc.subject
operation and maintenance
dc.subject
parking
dc.subject
parking restraints
dc.subject
passenger
dc.subject
passenger demand
dc.subject
passenger per hour
dc.subject
peak hour
dc.subject
peak hours
dc.subject
pedestrians
dc.subject
private automobile
dc.subject
private concession
dc.subject
private operators
dc.subject
public transport
dc.subject
public transport modes
dc.subject
public transport operations
dc.subject
public transport service
dc.subject
public transport supply
dc.subject
public transport users
dc.subject
river
dc.subject
road infrastructure
dc.subject
road traffic
dc.subject
safety
dc.subject
safety audit
dc.subject
smart cards
dc.subject
terminals
dc.subject
traffic control
dc.subject
traffic lanes
dc.subject
trains
dc.subject
transport
dc.subject
transportation
dc.subject
trips
dc.subject
trips by public
dc.subject
trolley
dc.subject
trolleybus
dc.subject
trolleys
dc.subject
trunk corridors
dc.subject
urban road
dc.subject
urban road space
dc.subject
urban roads
dc.subject
urban transport
dc.subject
urban transport projects
dc.subject
vans
dc.subject
vehicle
dc.subject
vehicle maintenance
dc.subject
walking
dc.subject
work trip
dc.subject
work trip time
dc.subject
concession
dc.subject
bus transportation
dc.subject
private sector participation
dc.subject
busway corridors
dc.subject
trolleybuses
dc.subject
traffic congestion
dc.subject
public transport
dc.subject
bidding process
dc.title
The Sao Mateus–Jabaquara Trolleybusway Concession in Brazil
en
okr.date.disclosure
2000-05-31
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Policy Research Working Paper
okr.globalpractice
Transport and ICT
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/1813-9450-2353
okr.identifier.report
WPS2353
okr.language.supported
en
okr.region.administrative
Latin America & Caribbean
okr.region.country
Brazil
okr.sector
Transportation
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development :: Banks & Banking Reform
okr.topic
Public Sector Development
okr.topic
Public Sector Development :: Decentralization
okr.topic
Transport
okr.topic
Transport :: Airports and Air Services
okr.unit
Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Sector Unit, Latin America and the Caribbean Region

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