Analyzing Urban Systems : Have Megacities Become Too Large?

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collection.link.213
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/11866
collection.name.213
Other papers
dc.contributor.author
Desmet, Klaus
dc.contributor.author
Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban
dc.date.accessioned
2014-04-02T19:44:28Z
dc.date.available
2014-04-02T19:44:28Z
dc.date.issued
2013-11
dc.date.lastModified
2017-12-14T04:37:16Z
dc.description.abstract
The trend toward ever greater urbanization continues unabated across the globe. According to the United Nations, by 2025 closes to 5 billion people will live in urban areas. Many cities, especially in the developing world, are set to explode in size. Over the next decade and a half, Lagos is expected to increase its population 50 percent, to nearly 16 million. Naturally, there is an active debate on whether restricting the growth of megacities is desirable and whether doing so can make residents of those cities and their countries better off. When analyzing whether megacities have become too large, policy makers often analyze a single city in depth. But no city is an island: improving urban infrastructure in one city might attract migrants, and a negative shock in one location can be mitigated because people can move to another. Considering the general equilibrium effects of any such urban policy is thus key. That is, when deciding whether to make medium-size cities more attractive, policy makers need to understand how cities of all sizes will be affected. The next section briefly summarizes the theoretical framework and discusses which data are needed. The third section implements the methodology for the benchmark case of the United States. The fourth section does the same for China and Mexico and compares the findings. And the last section concludes. A technical online appendix guides the reader through a practical, step-by-step, discussion of how to do the analysis.
en
dc.identifier
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2013/11/18868989/
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/17590
dc.language
English
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank, Washington, DC
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subject
AIR POLLUTION
dc.subject
BIG CITIES
dc.subject
CITIES
dc.subject
CITY GOVERNMENTS
dc.subject
CITY PRODUCTIVITY
dc.subject
CITY SIZE
dc.subject
EMPLOYMENT
dc.subject
ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS
dc.subject
HOUSING
dc.subject
HUMAN CAPITAL
dc.subject
INCOME
dc.subject
LARGE CITIES
dc.subject
MEGACITIES
dc.subject
METROPOLITAN AREAS
dc.subject
MUNICIPAL LEVEL
dc.subject
MUNICIPALITIES
dc.subject
QUALITY OF LIFE
dc.subject
REGIONAL POLICIES
dc.subject
ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE
dc.subject
SCHOOLS
dc.subject
SEWERAGE
dc.subject
SEWERAGE SYSTEMS
dc.subject
TAX RATES
dc.subject
URBAN AREAS
dc.subject
URBAN DEVELOPMENT
dc.subject
URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE
dc.subject
URBAN LAND
dc.subject
URBAN MIGRATION
dc.subject
URBAN POLICIES
dc.subject
URBAN POLICY
dc.subject
URBANIZATION
dc.title
Analyzing Urban Systems : Have Megacities Become Too Large?
en
okr.date.disclosure
2014-01-29
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Working Paper
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.docurl
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2013/11/18868989/
okr.globalpractice
Poverty
okr.globalpractice
Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience
okr.globalpractice
Governance
okr.globalpractice
Governance
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.externaldocumentum
000333037_20140129141722
okr.identifier.internaldocumentum
18868989
okr.identifier.report
84254
okr.language.supported
en
okr.pdfurl
http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2014/01/29/000333037_20140129141722/Rendered/PDF/842540WP0Desme0Box0382136B00PUBLIC0.pdf
en
okr.topic
Communities and Human Settlements :: Urban Slums Upgrading
okr.topic
Urban Development :: City Development Strategies
okr.topic
Urban Development :: Urban Governance and Management
okr.topic
Governance :: Regional Governance
okr.topic
Urban Development :: Urban Services to the Poor
okr.unit
Urban Development and Resilience (UDRUR)
okr.volume
1 of 1

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