Journal Article

Do Labor Statistics Depend on How and to Whom the Questions Are Asked? Results from a Survey Experiment in Tanzania

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collection.link.102
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2211
collection.name.102
A. World Bank Economic Review
dc.contributor.author
Bardasi, Elena
dc.contributor.author
Beegle, Kathleen
dc.contributor.author
Dillon, Andrew
dc.contributor.author
Serneels, Pieter
dc.date.accessioned
2013-05-21T14:03:01Z
dc.date.available
2013-05-21T14:03:01Z
dc.date.issued
2011-10-18
dc.date.lastModified
2017-12-14T04:04:41Z
dc.description.abstract
Labor market statistics are critical for assessing and understanding economic development. However, widespread variation exists in how labor statistics are collected in household surveys. This paper analyzes the effects of alternative survey design on employment statistics by implementing a randomized survey experiment in Tanzania. Two features of the survey design are assessed – the level of detail of the employment questions and the type of respondent. It turns out that both features have relevant and statistically significant effects on employment statistics. Using a short labor module without screening questions induces many individuals to adopt a broad definition of employment, incorrectly including domestic duties. But after reclassifying those in domestic work as ‘not working’ in order to obtain the correct ILO classification, the short module turns out to generate lower female employment rates, higher working hours for both men and women who are employed, and lower rates of wage employment than the detailed module. Response by proxy rather than self-report has no effect on female labor statistics but yields substantially lower male employment rates, mostly due to underreporting of agricultural activity. The large impacts of proxy responses on male employment rates are attenuated when proxy informants are spouses and individuals with some schooling.
en
dc.identifier.citation
World Bank Economic Review
dc.identifier.issn
1564-698X
dc.identifier.other
doi:10.1093/wber/lhr022
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/13483
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
World Bank
dc.relation.ispartofseries
World Bank Economic Review;25(3)
dc.rights
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo
dc.subject
child labor
dc.subject
employee
dc.subject
employment
dc.subject
employment rates
dc.subject
employment status
dc.subject
female employment
dc.subject
female labor
dc.subject
female labor force
dc.subject
Household Survey
dc.subject
household surveys
dc.subject
labor force
dc.subject
labor force participation
dc.subject
Labor market
dc.subject
Labor Statistics
dc.subject
Labour
dc.subject
Labour Force
dc.subject
unemployment
dc.subject
unemployment duration
dc.subject
wage employment
dc.subject
workers
dc.title
Do Labor Statistics Depend on How and to Whom the Questions Are Asked? Results from a Survey Experiment in Tanzania
en
dc.type
Journal Article
en
okr.crosscuttingsolutionarea
Jobs
okr.date.disclosure
2013-04-18
okr.doctype
Journal Article
okr.globalpractice
Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience
okr.globalpractice
Education
okr.globalpractice
Social Protection and Labor
okr.globalpractice
Finance and Markets
okr.globalpractice
Health, Nutrition, and Population
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1093/wber/lhr022
okr.journal.nbpages
418-447
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.region.country
Tanzania
okr.topic
Communities and Human Settlements :: Housing & Human Habitats
okr.topic
Education :: Educational Policy and Planning
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development :: Banks & Banking Reform
okr.topic
Health, Nutrition and Population :: Population Policies
okr.topic
Social Development :: Social Analysis
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Management and Relations
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Markets
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Policies
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Standards
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Work & Working Conditions
okr.volume
25(3)

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