World Investment and Political Risk 2011

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collection.link.240
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/15499
collection.name.240
World Investment and Political Risk
dc.contributor.author
Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency
dc.date.accessioned
2013-02-20T18:58:05Z
dc.date.available
2013-02-20T18:58:05Z
dc.date.issued
2011-01
dc.date.lastModified
2021-04-23T14:03:06Z
dc.description.abstract
The mission of the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) is to promote foreign direct investment (FDI) into developing countries to support economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve people's lives. As part of this mandate, the agency seeks to foster a better understanding of investors' perceptions of political risk as they relate to FDI, as well as the role of the political risk insurance (PRI) industry in mitigating these risks. Today's economic turbulence and fragility in developed countries are again posing challenges for the global economy. Developing countries are feeling the impact through multiple channels, including through the flows of FDI and private capital. Having rebounded sharply in 2010, FDI flows to developing countries continued to increase in 2011, but are expected to moderate going forward. The report highlights once again the salience of political risk as an important concern for multinational enterprises that seek to invest in developing countries. This is also reflected in the increased issuance of new political risk insurance in 2010, a trend that seems to be continuing in 2011, helped by a growing awareness of insurance as a risk-mitigation tool. This year the report also pays special attention to the FDI picture in the Middle East and North Africa region in light of the Arab Spring, as well as the reaction of multinational enterprises to these developments. This year's report puts a spotlight on expropriation, a political risk with a long and recurring history, and examines motivations of host-country governments in deciding whether to expropriate. The report also highlights the role of political or economic shocks in triggering expropriations. It finds that investor disputes are more likely to be resolved by democratically elected governments rather than non-democratic regimes. This suggests that the propensity to expropriate is significantly higher in countries with non-democratic regimes, a finding that should be of interest to investors who are more concerned about political stability than about regime type and political institutions. Research conducted for this report, including the MIGA- Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) survey and discussions with London-based private sector PRI underwriters and brokers, showed that the views of investors and PRI providers regarding regime type and expropriation risk differ slightly. Underwriters and brokers did not find the empirical results surprising and agreed that these results support their overall underwriting views.
en
dc.identifier.isbn
978-0-8213-8850-1
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/12430
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
Washington, DC: World Bank
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
Access to financing
dc.subject
accounting
dc.subject
adverse effect
dc.subject
adverse effects
dc.subject
arbitral awards
dc.subject
arbitration
dc.subject
banking sector
dc.subject
banking system
dc.subject
barrier
dc.subject
brokers
dc.subject
budget deficits
dc.subject
business environments
dc.subject
Capital Flows
dc.subject
capital markets
dc.subject
capital requirements
dc.subject
checks
dc.subject
civil wars
dc.subject
commodity
dc.subject
commodity prices
dc.subject
contract renegotiations
dc.subject
contractual obligations
dc.subject
convertibility restrictions
dc.subject
Copyright Clearance
dc.subject
Copyright Clearance Center
dc.subject
corporate investment
dc.subject
Corporate investor
dc.subject
Corporate investors
dc.subject
credit agency
dc.subject
credit default
dc.subject
credit default swap
dc.subject
credit default swaps
dc.subject
credit market
dc.subject
Currency devaluation
dc.subject
current account balances
dc.subject
debt crises
dc.subject
debt crisis
dc.subject
default risk
dc.subject
democracies
dc.subject
democracy
dc.subject
demographic
dc.subject
deregulation
dc.subject
developing countries
dc.subject
Developing country
dc.subject
developing economies
dc.subject
domestic economies
dc.subject
domestic investors
dc.subject
domestic market
dc.subject
domestic markets
dc.subject
downside risks
dc.subject
drivers
dc.subject
economic conditions
dc.subject
economic crises
dc.subject
economic crisis
dc.subject
economic downturn
dc.subject
Economic Empowerment
dc.subject
economic growth
dc.subject
economic policies
dc.subject
economic recovery
dc.subject
emerging markets
dc.subject
environmental impacts
dc.subject
equity flows
dc.subject
equity index
dc.subject
Export credit
dc.subject
exporters
dc.subject
exposure
dc.subject
Expropriation
dc.subject
expropriation risk
dc.subject
Expropriations
dc.subject
Finance Corporation
dc.subject
financial crisis
dc.subject
financial flows
dc.subject
Financial instability
dc.subject
financial institutions
dc.subject
Financial sector
dc.subject
financial volatility
dc.subject
fiscal consolidation
dc.subject
fiscal deficits
dc.subject
foreign banks
dc.subject
foreign companies
dc.subject
foreign currency
dc.subject
Foreign Direct Investment
dc.subject
Foreign Direct Investments
dc.subject
foreign exchange
dc.subject
Foreign Investment
dc.subject
foreign investments
dc.subject
Foreign Investors
dc.subject
General Insurance
dc.subject
global economy
dc.subject
global investors
dc.subject
good governance
dc.subject
government deficit
dc.subject
government guarantees
dc.subject
government intervention
dc.subject
government regulation
dc.subject
Gross domestic product
dc.subject
host countries
dc.subject
host country
dc.subject
host government
dc.subject
host governments
dc.subject
income
dc.subject
income streams
dc.subject
income taxes
dc.subject
inflation
dc.subject
inflationary pressures
dc.subject
Innovation
dc.subject
Insurance
dc.subject
insurance agencies
dc.subject
Insurance Industry
dc.subject
Insurance Market
dc.subject
insurer
dc.subject
intangible
dc.subject
International Bank
dc.subject
International emerging markets
dc.subject
International Finance
dc.subject
international investment
dc.subject
international investors
dc.subject
international trade
dc.subject
investing
dc.subject
Investment Corporation
dc.subject
Investment Disputes
dc.subject
Investment Flows
dc.subject
investment insurance
dc.subject
investment opportunities
dc.subject
Investment Plans
dc.subject
investment projects
dc.subject
investment regimes
dc.subject
investor perceptions
dc.subject
investor perspectives
dc.subject
investor uncertainty
dc.subject
issuance
dc.subject
liability
dc.subject
local currency
dc.subject
low-income countries
dc.subject
low-income economies
dc.subject
macroeconomic data
dc.subject
Macroeconomic instability
dc.subject
macroeconomic stability
dc.subject
market conditions
dc.subject
market pricing
dc.subject
middle-income countries
dc.subject
Monetary Fund
dc.subject
motivation
dc.subject
Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency
dc.subject
natural resources
dc.subject
net debt
dc.subject
new markets
dc.subject
non-performing loans
dc.subject
outsourcing
dc.subject
policy response
dc.subject
political institutions
dc.subject
political power
dc.subject
Political Regime
dc.subject
political regimes
dc.subject
Political Risk
dc.subject
Political Risk Insurance
dc.subject
Political Risks
dc.subject
political stability
dc.subject
political system
dc.subject
political systems
dc.subject
portfolio
dc.subject
Private Capital
dc.subject
Private Capital Flows
dc.subject
private creditors
dc.subject
Private debt
dc.subject
Private Investment
dc.subject
Private Investments
dc.subject
private investor
dc.subject
private investors
dc.subject
Private Market
dc.subject
productivity
dc.subject
property rights
dc.subject
public policy
dc.subject
Public utilities
dc.subject
rate of growth
dc.subject
regime change
dc.subject
regulatory agencies
dc.subject
regulatory frameworks
dc.subject
regulatory oversight
dc.subject
regulatory regime
dc.subject
repayment
dc.subject
repudiation
dc.subject
reputation
dc.subject
reputations
dc.subject
return
dc.subject
risk assessment
dc.subject
risk factor
dc.subject
Risk Management
dc.subject
risk of expropriation
dc.subject
rule of law
dc.subject
Settlement
dc.subject
Sovereign debt
dc.subject
sovereign risk
dc.subject
stocks
dc.subject
sub-national entities
dc.subject
suppliers
dc.subject
tax
dc.subject
tax revenues
dc.subject
Terrorism
dc.subject
Transparency
dc.subject
Transparency Initiative
dc.subject
treaties
dc.subject
underwriters
dc.subject
underwriting
dc.subject
withdrawal
dc.subject
world economy
dc.subject
World Trade
dc.title
World Investment and Political Risk 2011
en
okr.crosscuttingsolutionarea
Jobs
okr.date.disclosure
2012-12-10
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Publication
okr.doctype
Publications & Research
okr.globalpractice
Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management
okr.globalpractice
Social Protection and Labor
okr.globalpractice
Finance and Markets
okr.globalpractice
Trade and Competitiveness
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.report
73168
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development :: Non Bank Financial Institutions
okr.topic
Private Sector Development :: Emerging Markets
okr.topic
Finance and Financial Sector Development :: Debt Markets
okr.topic
Social Protections and Labor :: Labor Policies
okr.topic
Macroeconomics and Economic Growth :: Investment and Investment Climate
okr.unit
Credit Risk (CFRCR)

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