Localizing Development : Does Participation Work?

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collection.link.63
https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2171
collection.name.63
Policy Research Reports
dc.contributor.author
Mansuri, Ghazala
dc.contributor.author
Rao, Vijayendra
dc.date.accessioned
2012-11-15T00:01:48Z
dc.date.available
2012-11-15T00:01:48Z
dc.date.issued
2013
dc.description.abstract
The Policy Research Report Localizing Development: Does Participation Work? brings analytical rigor to a field that has been the subject of intense debate and advocacy, and billions of dollars in development aid. It briefly reviews the history of participatory development and argues that its two modalities, community-based development and local decentralization, should be treated under the broader unifying umbrella of local development. It suggests that a distinction between organic participation (endogenous efforts by civic activists to bring about change) and induced participation (large-scale efforts to engineer participation at the local level via projects) is key, and focuses on the challenges of inducing participation. The report provides a conceptual framework for thinking about participatory development and then uses this framework to conduct a comprehensive review of the literature. The framework develops the concept of “civil society failure” and explains its interaction with government and market failures. It argues that participatory development, which is often viewed as a mechanism for bypassing market and government failures by ”harnessing” civic capacity, ought to be seen instead as a mechanism that, if done right, could help to repair important civil society failures. It distills literature from anthropology, economics, sociology, and political science to outline the challenges for effective policy in this area, looking at issues such as the uncertainty of trajectories of change, the importance of context, the role of elite capture and control, the challenge of collective action, and the role of the state. The review of the evidence looks at a variety of issues: the impact of participatory projects on inclusion, civic capacity, and social cohesion; on key development outcomes, such as income, poverty, and inequality; on public service delivery; and on the quality of local public goods. It draws on the evidence to suggest several recommendations for policy, emphasizing the key role of learning-by-doing. It then reviews participatory projects funded by the World Bank and finds the majority lacking in several arenas – particularly in paying attention to context and in creating effective monitoring and evaluation systems that allow for learning.
en
dc.identifier.isbn
978-0-8213-8256-1
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/10986/11859
dc.language.iso
en_US
dc.publisher
Washington, DC: World Bank
dc.relation.ispartofseries
Policy Research Report;
dc.rights
CC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.holder
World Bank
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.subject
Civil society
dc.subject
Civil society failure
dc.subject
Community-based development
dc.subject
Community-driven development
dc.subject
Decentralization
dc.subject
Monitoring and evaluation
dc.subject
M&E
dc.subject
Participation
dc.title
Localizing Development : Does Participation Work?
en
okr.date.disclosure
2012-11-14
okr.doctype
Publications & Research :: Publication
okr.globalpractice
Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience
okr.globalpractice
Governance
okr.globalpractice
Poverty
okr.globalpractice
Governance
okr.googlescholar.linkpresent
yes
okr.identifier.doi
10.1596/978-0-8213-8256-1
okr.identifier.report
73762
okr.language.supported
en
okr.peerreview
Academic Peer Review
okr.topic
Social Development
okr.topic
Governance
okr.topic
Poverty Reduction
okr.topic
Social Development :: Participations and Civic Engagement
okr.topic
Governance :: Local Government
okr.topic
Public Sector Development :: Decentralization
okr.topic
Education For All
okr.topic
Education Finance
okr.topic
Civil Society
okr.unit
DECRG

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