Publication: Farm Debt in the CIS : A Multi-Country Study of the Major Causes and Proposed Solutions

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Date
2001-05
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Published
2001-05
Author(s)
Csaki, Csaba
Lerman, Zvi
Sotnikov, Sergey
Abstract
The objective of this study is to support the farm privatization and restructuring process in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) by presenting a wide range of strategic and tactical options that could be applied to eliminate, or at least reduce, the main factors responsible for the destructive accumulation of debt in large farm enterprises. This objective has accomplished by documenting and analyzing the indebtedness of large-scale farms in five countries of CIS (Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine) developing appropriate proposals, and initiating a dialogue with the government on the subject of farm debt resolution. The study presents a region-wide analysis of the farm debt problem based on data collected from selected countries in CIS, and develops proposals for the respective countries as well as for the region as a whole.
Citation
Csaki, Csaba; Lerman, Zvi; Sotnikov, Sergey. 2001. Farm Debt in the CIS : A Multi-Country Study of the Major Causes and Proposed Solutions. World Bank Discussion Paper;424. © Washington, DC: World Bank. http://openknowledge.worldbank.org/entities/publication/b42290e5-8926-5fb9-9579-657212794cc2 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.
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