Person:
Taglioni, Daria

Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group
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International economics, Trade
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Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group
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Last updated: July 11, 2023
Biography
Daria Taglioni is Research Manager, Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group. She joined the World Bank Group in 2011 as Senior Trade Economist in the International Trade Department of the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network (PREM). Since then, she has held various positions and roles, including Team-Task Lead for the World Development Report 2020, Principal Economist in the International Finance Corporation, and World Bank’s Global Lead on Global Value Chains. Previously, she worked as Senior Economist at the European Central Bank (ECB) and as Economist at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). She has published in the American Economic Review, Journal of International Economics, and other scholarly journals. Her work has been featured in international media outlet such as the New York Times and Forbes. She authored various books on international trade. She is Italian and holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Citations 25 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Making Global Value Chains Work for Development
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2016-06-06) Taglioni, Daria; Winkler, Deborah
    Economic, technological, and political shifts as well as changing business strategies have driven firms to unbundle production processes and disperse them across countries. Thanks to these changes, developing countries can now increase their participation in global value chains (GVCs) and thus become more competitive in agriculture, manufacturing and services. This is a paradigm shift from the 20th century when countries had to build the entire supply chain domestically to become competitive internationally. For policymakers, the focus is on boosting domestic value added and improving access to resources and technology while advancing development goals. However, participating in global value chains does not automatically improve living standards and social conditions in a country. This requires not only improving the quality and quantity of production factors and redressing market failures, but also engineering equitable distributions of opportunities and outcomes - including employment, wages, work conditions, economic rights, gender equality, economic security, and protecting the environment. The internationalization of production processes helps with very few of these development challenges. Following this perspective, Making Global Value Chains Work for Development offers a strategic framework, analytical tools, and policy options to address this challenge. The book conceptualizes GVCs and makes it easier for policymakers and practitioners to discuss them and their implications for development. It shows why GVCs require fresh thinking; it serves as a repository of analytical tools; and it proposes a strategic framework to guide policymakers in identifying the key objectives of GVC participation and in selecting suitable economic strategies to achieve them.
  • Publication
    Economic Upgrading through Global Value Chain Participation: Which Policies Increase the Value Added Gains?
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-03) Kummritz, Victor; Taglioni, Daria; Winkler, Deborah
    The emergence of global value chains has opened up new ways to achieve development and industrialization. However, new evidence shows that not all countries have gained from participating in global value chains, and that country-specific characteristics matter for economic upgrading in global value chains. This paper uses two panel data sets of developing and industrialized countries at the sectoral level to relate global value chain participation as a buyer and seller to domestic value added. These are combined with a wide range of policy measures at the country level that can play a role in economic upgrading through global value chains, by targeting global value chain integration or the quality and conditions of input and output factors. First, the study finds that global value chain integration increases domestic value added, especially on the selling side, which holds across all income levels. Second, the results highlight the importance of policy for economic upgrading through global value chain integration. Although the study cannot claim causal evidence, all the assessed policy areas are consistently shown to mediate the effects of global value chains and magnify the gains for domestic value added. Third, a detailed analysis shows that several policy areas mediate the gains from global value chains more through integration as a seller. Finally, the study observes that many of the results are driven by high- and upper-middle-income countries.
  • Publication
    Economic Consequences of Trade and Global Value Chain Integration: A Measurement Perspective
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-09) Borin, Alessandro; Mancini, Michele; Taglioni, Daria
    This paper presents a new approach to measuring Global Value Chain (GVC) participation, essential for informed policy-making. It introduces a tripartite classification of GVC involvement—backward, forward, and two-sided— extending beyond trade to include production data. GVCs, vital for global economic growth, are networks through which companies internationally produce goods and services. The advanced framework accurately assesses how different combinations of domestic output, trade, and GVC integration correlate with growth and output stability. The paper finds that traditional trade-based GVC metrics significantly underestimate global GVC activity and misrepresent participation in key sectors like services and upstream manufacturing. They also exaggerate risks during critical stages like early trade liberalization in large economies. Additionally, it shows that traditional backward-forward classifications overestimate backward linkages. The new metrics, applied to established models, effectively predict trade disruption impacts, indicating that GVC participation increases exposure to external shocks but also enhances overall output stability by mitigating local shocks. Furthermore, GVC participation is a key driver of the positive trade-income growth correlation. The complete dataset of these new measures is available on the World Bank’s WITS Platform, and it is regularly updated, providing a key resource for GVC analysis.