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Taglioni, Daria

Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group
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International economics, Trade
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Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group
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Last updated: June 17, 2024
Biography
Daria Taglioni is Research Manager, Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group. She joined the World Bank Group in 2011 as Senior Trade Economist in the International Trade Department of the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network (PREM). Since then, she has held various positions and roles, including Team-Task Lead for the World Development Report 2020, Principal Economist in the International Finance Corporation, and World Bank’s Global Lead on Global Value Chains. Previously, she worked as Senior Economist at the European Central Bank (ECB) and as Economist at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). She has published in the American Economic Review, Journal of International Economics, and other scholarly journals. Her work has been featured in international media outlet such as the New York Times and Forbes. She authored various books on international trade. She is Italian and holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Citations 25 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    Vietnam at a Crossroads: Engaging in the Next Generation of Global Value Chains
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2017-03-07) Hollweg, Claire H.; Taglioni, Daria
    Vietnam is at a crossroads. It can grow as an export platform for GVCs, specializing in low value-added assembly functions with industrialization occurring in enclaves with little connection to the broader economy or society; or it can leverage the current wave of growth, enabled and accelerated by its successful participation in GVCs, to diversify and move up the chain into higher value-added functions. Success will require Vietnam’s policymakers to view the processes of development differently, and to take new realities of the global economy more fully into account. The purpose of this volume is to support Vietnam’s path to economic prosperity by identifying policies and targeted interventions that will drive development through leveraging GVC participation that take major shifts in trade policy and rapid technological advances in ICT into account. The volume is based on a compilation of studies completed by World Bank staff and external consultants in 2015 supporting the “Enabling Economic Modernization and Private Sector Development” chapter of the Vietnam 2035 report. The objective of these studies was to diagnose Vietnam’s current participation in GVCs, visualize where Vietnam could be by 2035 in the context of a changing global environment, and identify the policy actions needed to get there. The studies also supported topics related more broadly to export competitiveness, including firm-level productivity, services, and connectivity. It then identifies targeted strategies and policy interventions that will help overcome challenges, minimize risks, and maximize opportunities. Readers will gain a strong understanding of Vietnam’s current and potential engagement with GVCs—and will learn about strategic GVC policy tools that can help developing countries achieve economic prosperity in the context of compressed development.
  • Publication
    Inclusive Global Value Chains: Policy Options for Small and Medium Enterprises and Low-Income Countries
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2016-08-22) Cusolito, Ana Paula; Taglioni, Daria
    This report's focus is making global value chains (GVCs) more inclusive. To achieve inclusiveness is by overcoming participation constraints for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and facilitation access for Low Income Developing Countries (LIDCs). The underlying assumption is that most firms in LIDCs are SMEs. Even larger firms in LIDCs are likely to face similar challenges to SMEs, including a less supportive domestic operating environment and weaker institutions that lead to higher fixed costs and challenges to compete on the international markets. The two major points of this report are (1) participation in GVCs is heterogeneous and uneven, across and within countries, and (2) available data and survey-based evidence suggest that SMEs’ participation in GVCs is mostly taking place through indirect contribution to exports, rather than through exporting directly. The report makes the case that policy action, at the national and multilateral level, can make a difference in achieving more inclusive GVCs through: a holistic approach to reform spanning trade, investment, and domestic policies countries and investments in expanding the statistical base and analysis of GVCs and in sharing knowledge on best practices on enabling policies and programs. The report elaborates on three broad areas of recommendations: (1) establishing a trade and investment action plan for inclusiveness defining clear and achievable objectives on trade and investment policy and identifying the necessary complementary domestic policy actions; (2) complementing trade, investment, and domestic policy actions by providing the needed political leadership and support to enhance collaboration across the sectors, and establishing global platforms for sharing best practices; and (3) providing political support for the establishment of a multi-year plan to expand and upgrade the statistical foundation necessary to increase the capacity of all countries to identify and implement policies that can contribute to stronger, more inclusive and sustainable growth and development, globally.
  • Publication
    Making Global Value Chains Work for Development
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2016-06-06) Taglioni, Daria; Winkler, Deborah
    Economic, technological, and political shifts as well as changing business strategies have driven firms to unbundle production processes and disperse them across countries. Thanks to these changes, developing countries can now increase their participation in global value chains (GVCs) and thus become more competitive in agriculture, manufacturing and services. This is a paradigm shift from the 20th century when countries had to build the entire supply chain domestically to become competitive internationally. For policymakers, the focus is on boosting domestic value added and improving access to resources and technology while advancing development goals. However, participating in global value chains does not automatically improve living standards and social conditions in a country. This requires not only improving the quality and quantity of production factors and redressing market failures, but also engineering equitable distributions of opportunities and outcomes - including employment, wages, work conditions, economic rights, gender equality, economic security, and protecting the environment. The internationalization of production processes helps with very few of these development challenges. Following this perspective, Making Global Value Chains Work for Development offers a strategic framework, analytical tools, and policy options to address this challenge. The book conceptualizes GVCs and makes it easier for policymakers and practitioners to discuss them and their implications for development. It shows why GVCs require fresh thinking; it serves as a repository of analytical tools; and it proposes a strategic framework to guide policymakers in identifying the key objectives of GVC participation and in selecting suitable economic strategies to achieve them.
  • Publication
    Exporter Dynamics and Partial-Year Effects
    (American Economic Association, 2017-10) Bernard, Andrew B.; Boler, Esther Ann; Massari, Renzo; Reyes, Jose-Daniel; Taglioni, Daria
    Two identical firms who start exporting in different months, one each in January and December, will report dramatically different exports for the first calendar year. This partial-year effect biases down first-year export levels and biases up first-year export growth rates. For Peruvian exporters, the partial-year bias is large: first-year export levels are understated by 54 percent and the first-year growth rate is overstated by 112 percentage points. Correcting the partial-year effect dramatically reduces first-year export growth rates, raises initial export levels, and almost doubles the contribution of net firm entry and exit to overall export growth.
  • Publication
    Massive Modularity: Understanding Industry Organization in the Digital Age — The Case of Mobile Phone Handsets
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-09) Thun, Eric; Taglioni, Daria; Sturgeon, Timothy; Dallas, Mark P.
    Digitization is transforming the organization and geography of industries. Once digitized, information can be generated, collected, stored, monitored, analyzed, and processed in ways not previously possible, and when common standards are used as modular interfaces, data can be transferred and put to use with greater ease across organizations and geographic space. An important effect of digitization on industrial organization is the emergence of global-scale modular ecosystems associated with specific classes of products, applications, and technologies. The modules and sub-systems in these ecosystems can—albeit with significant engineering effort, because they are complex—be reused, connected, and layered to drive innovation and deliver products and services with immense complexity at scale. The nuances of this transformation have not been lost on the field of technology management and innovation. The primary focus of this literature has been on how to capture value in modular ecosystems, mainly by focusing on how to companies can influence or leverage industry architectures and “win” in an era of digital platforms. This paper makes three contributions to these literatures, as well as to literatures on global value chains (GVCs), industry standards, and industrial policy in the post- “Washington Consensus” era: 1) it develops a broader view of modular and platform ecosystems than has been advanced so far, highlighting the overlapping and layered nature of digital industry ecosystems; 2) it focuses on the multiplicity of standards that bind modular ecosystems together; and 3) it draws attention to the geographic and geopolitical implications of what it calls Massive Modular Ecosystems (MMEs). The case study of the mobile phone handset industry reveals three paradoxes associated with MMEs: 1) they allow for extremely complex products to be produced at scale, unlike more traditional industries; 2) they simultaneously feature high degrees of market concentration at the level of complex sub-systems and components, and market fragmentation at the level of the industry overall and at the level of complementors; and 3) they are concentrated in geographic clusters, but because MMEs integrate work carried out in many specialized clusters in many countries, the system as a whole is geographically dispersed. This leads to a fourth, policy-related paradox: MMEs generate strategic and geopolitical pressures for decoupling when placed under stress, but the same set of circumstances also creates pressures for maintaining the business relationships and institutions that have come to underpin global integration.
  • Publication
    Economic Upgrading through Global Value Chain Participation: Which Policies Increase the Value Added Gains?
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-03) Kummritz, Victor; Taglioni, Daria; Winkler, Deborah
    The emergence of global value chains has opened up new ways to achieve development and industrialization. However, new evidence shows that not all countries have gained from participating in global value chains, and that country-specific characteristics matter for economic upgrading in global value chains. This paper uses two panel data sets of developing and industrialized countries at the sectoral level to relate global value chain participation as a buyer and seller to domestic value added. These are combined with a wide range of policy measures at the country level that can play a role in economic upgrading through global value chains, by targeting global value chain integration or the quality and conditions of input and output factors. First, the study finds that global value chain integration increases domestic value added, especially on the selling side, which holds across all income levels. Second, the results highlight the importance of policy for economic upgrading through global value chain integration. Although the study cannot claim causal evidence, all the assessed policy areas are consistently shown to mediate the effects of global value chains and magnify the gains for domestic value added. Third, a detailed analysis shows that several policy areas mediate the gains from global value chains more through integration as a seller. Finally, the study observes that many of the results are driven by high- and upper-middle-income countries.
  • Publication
    Economic Consequences of Trade and Global Value Chain Integration: A Measurement Perspective
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-09) Borin, Alessandro; Mancini, Michele; Taglioni, Daria
    This paper presents a new approach to measuring Global Value Chain (GVC) participation, essential for informed policy-making. It introduces a tripartite classification of GVC involvement—backward, forward, and two-sided— extending beyond trade to include production data. GVCs, vital for global economic growth, are networks through which companies internationally produce goods and services. The advanced framework accurately assesses how different combinations of domestic output, trade, and GVC integration correlate with growth and output stability. The paper finds that traditional trade-based GVC metrics significantly underestimate global GVC activity and misrepresent participation in key sectors like services and upstream manufacturing. They also exaggerate risks during critical stages like early trade liberalization in large economies. Additionally, it shows that traditional backward-forward classifications overestimate backward linkages. The new metrics, applied to established models, effectively predict trade disruption impacts, indicating that GVC participation increases exposure to external shocks but also enhances overall output stability by mitigating local shocks. Furthermore, GVC participation is a key driver of the positive trade-income growth correlation. The complete dataset of these new measures is available on the World Bank’s WITS Platform, and it is regularly updated, providing a key resource for GVC analysis.
  • Publication
    Trade Effects of Industrial Policies: Are Preferential Agreements a Shield?
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-06-17) Barattieri, Alessandro; Mattoo, Aaditya; Taglioni, Daria
    This paper explores the effects of industrial policy on trade, focusing on the role of preferential trade agreements. The analysis uses data for the period 2012–2022 on detailed product-level bilateral trade, industrial policy announcements, and rules on subsidies in different preferential trade agreements. The introduction of a new industrial policy measure in a destination market reduces export growth to that market on average by about 0.28 percent. However, exports from fellow members of preferential trade agreements are not adversely affected and may even be positively affected if the agreements have deep disciplines on subsidies. These findings suggest that preferential trade agreements have a shielding effect against the trade distorting effects of industrial policies.