Person:
Yamauchi, Futoshi

Agriculture and Rural Development Unit, Development Research Group, The World Bank
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Fields of Specialization
Agriculture and food security; economics of education; education, skills development, and the labor market
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Agriculture and Rural Development Unit, Development Research Group, The World Bank
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Last updated: January 31, 2023
Biography
Futoshi Yamauchi is Senior Economist at the Agriculture and Rural Development unit of Development Research Group. His specializations include human capital formation, the labor market, agriculture, rural development, social learning, and governance issues in developing countries. He has extensive field experience in Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, South Africa, Thailand, and Zambia. Recently, Futoshi has conducted analytical works to support the education sector in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. His papers were published in major journals such as Journal of Development Economics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, Journal of Development Studies, World Development, Demography, Economics of Education Review, and others. Prior to the Bank, Futoshi was a research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute, and has taught at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Yokohama National University, and Kyoto University. Born in Japan, Futoshi received his B.A. in law and M.A. in economics from Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.
Citations 21 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
  • Publication
    Asymmetric Information on Noncognitive Skills in the Indian Labor Market: An Experiment in Online Job Portal
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-03) Imaizumi, Saori; Yamauchi, Futoshi; Areias, Ana; Nomura, Shinsaku; Chowdhury, Afra
    This paper examines the impact of noncognitive (socio-emotional) skills on job market outcomes, using a randomized control trial implemented in an online job portal in India. Job seekers who registered in the portal were asked to take a Big-Five type personality test and, for a random subsample of the test takers, the results were displayed to potential employers. The outcomes are measured by whether a potential employer shortlisted a job seeker by opening (unlocking) his/her application and background information. The results show that the treatment group for whom test results were shown generally enjoyed a higher probability of unlock. That is, employers are more interested in those for whom they can see personality test results. Such a relationship was not seen in the pre-test period, which confirms that the results are unlikely to be spurious. The study also finds a significant impact among organized, calm, imaginative, and/or quiet applicants (no effect is detected among easy-going, sensitive, realistic, and/or outgoing applicants), which seems to display employers' preference.