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Corduneanu-Huci, Cristina

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Political economy of development, Politics of taxation, Fiscal transparency
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Last updated: January 31, 2023
Biography
Cristina Corduneanu-Huci is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy at the Central European University, Budapest. She holds a PhD in Political Science from Duke University. Her research focuses on the political economy of non-democratic regimes, development policies, state capacity, and government transparency. Her work has appeared in Comparative Sociology, the World Bank Policy Research Working Papers series, and several edited volumes. She is the co-author of Understanding Policy Change: How to Apply Political Economy Concepts in Practice, a book that explores the complex relationship between politics and economic development.

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  • Publication
    The Political Economy of Healthcare Litigation : Model and Empirical Application to Uruguay
    (2011-09-01) Corduneanu-Huci, Cristina; Masses-Ferrer, Issel
    The political economy of health care is complex, as stakeholders have conflicting preferences over efficiency and equity. This paper formally models the preferences of consumer and producer groups involved in priority setting and judicialization in public health care. It uses a unique dataset of stakeholder perceptions, from Uruguay, to test whether these hypotheses are consistent with empirical evidence. The results suggest that the expectations of the political economy literature are supported: 1) regulators of public healthcare are less concerned with efficiency considerations than consumers; and 2) less organized groups are more concerned about equity than more organized interest groups. With respect to the consequences of health litigation, the findings are only partially consistent with the health care governance literature. Consumers perceive litigation as more beneficial than health care providers and regulators do. Counter-intuitively, powerful interest groups seem less willing to use litigation to shape policy outcomes.