Person:
Muzzini, Elisa

Global Practice Social, Urban, Rural & Resilience
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Fields of Specialization
city competitiveness and urban regeneration; municipal infrastructure and service delivery
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ORCID
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Global Practice Social, Urban, Rural & Resilience
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Last updated: January 31, 2023
Biography
Elisa Muzzini is a Senior Economist with experience working on a wide range of urban development issues in both low and middle income countries. Her primary areas of focus are urban infrastructure and municipal service delivery, city competitiveness, urban regeneration and sustainable tourism development. She is currently in the Latin America and Caribbean region, where she manages urban development operations and analytical work in Haiti and Argentina. In the South Asia region, she managed operations, technical assistance and analytical work in Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and India. Early in her career, Elisa worked for private economic consulting firms on infrastructure regulation and competition policy. She received a graduate degree in Economics with a concentration in public financial policy from the London School of Economics and a BA in Economics from Bocconi University in Italy.

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
  • Publication
    Consumer Participation in Infrastructure Regulation : Evidence from the East Asia and Pacific Region
    (Washington, DC : World Bank, 2005) Muzzini, Elisa
    Consumer Participation in Infrastructure Regulation draws on results of a survey questionnaire conducted among 45 infrastructure regulators in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region. It finds that EAP regulators have successfully begun to involve consumers in the regulatory process: consumer representation is a well-established practice in the region; and regulators draw on standard mechanisms to inform consumers, resolve consumer complaints, and solicit consumer input. However, regulators must take further actions to firmly move up the "ladder of consumer engagement," from merely providing information to actively consulting with consumers. In particular, consumer participation would benefit from more open disclosure policies, more effective strategies to reach out to the poor, and, tighter regulatory intervention to hold service providers accountable for resolving consumer complaints.