Person:
Kose, M. Ayhan

Prospects Group, The World Bank
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International macroeconomics, International finance
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Prospects Group, The World Bank
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Last updated: April 14, 2024
Biography
Ayhan Kose is the Deputy Chief Economist of the World Bank Group and Director of the Prospects Group. He is a member of the Chief Economist’s leadership team overseeing the Bank’s analytical work, and policy and operational advice. He also leads the Bank’s work on the global macroeconomic outlook, financial flows, and commodity markets. Under his management, the Prospects Group produces the Bank’s flagship reports Global Economic Prospects and Commodity Markets Outlook, in addition to other policy and analytical publications. Prior to joining the World Bank, he was Assistant to the Director of the Research Department and Deputy Chief of the Multilateral Surveillance Division in the International Monetary Fund (IMF). He served in a wide range of roles supporting IMF’s analytical, policy, and operational work. Mr. Kose is a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Dean’s Fellow at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), and a Research Associate at the Center for Applied Macroeconomics (CAMA). He taught at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, INSEAD, and Brandeis International Business School. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa and a B.S. in industrial engineering from Bilkent University. A native of Turkey, Mr. Kose was born and raised in Istanbul.
Citations 6 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Understanding Inflation in Emerging and Developing Economies
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-02) Ha, Jongrim; Kose, M. Ayhan; Ohnsorge, Franziska L.
    Emerging market and developing economies (EMDEs) have experienced an extraordinary decline in inflation since the early 1970s. After peaking in 1974 at 17.3 percent, inflation in these economies declined to 3.5 percent in 2017. Despite a checkered history of managing inflation among many EMDEs, disinflation occurred across all regions. This paper presents a summary of a recent book, "Inflation in Emerging and Developing Economies: Evolution, Drivers, and Policies," that analyzes this remarkable achievement. The findings suggest that many EMDEs enjoy the benefits of stability-oriented and resilient monetary policy frameworks, including central bank transparency and independence. Such policy frameworks need to be complemented by strong macroeconomic and institutional arrangements. Inflation expectations are more weakly anchored in EMDEs than in advanced economies. In EMDEs that do not operate inflation targeting frameworks, exchange rate movements tend to have larger and more persistent effects on inflation.
  • Publication
    What Explains Global Inflation
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2023-12-21) Ha, Jongrim; Kose, M. Ayhan; Ohnsorge, Franziska; Yilmazkuday, Hakan
    This paper examines the drivers of fluctuations in global inflation, defined as a common factor across monthly headline consumer price index (CPI) inflation in G7 countries, over the past half-century. It estimates a Factor-Augmented Vector Autoregression model where a wide range of shocks, including global demand, supply, oil price, and interest rate shocks, are identified through narrative sign restrictions motivated by the predictions of a simple dynamic general equilibrium model. The authors report three main results. First, oil price shocks followed by global demand shocks explained the lion’s share of variation in global inflation. Second, the contribution of global demand and oil price shocks increased over time, from 56 percent during 1970–1985 to 65 percent during 2001–2022, whereas the importance of global supply shocks declined. Since the pandemic, global demand and oil price shocks have accounted for most of the variation in global inflation. Finally, oil price shocks played a much smaller role in global core CPI inflation variation, for which global supply shocks were the main source of variation. These results are robust to various sensitivity exercises, including alternative definitions of global variables, different samples of countries, and additional narrative restrictions.