Person:
Ghorpade, Yashodhan

Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice
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Fields of Specialization
Social protection, Poverty, Conflict
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Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice
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Last updated: December 14, 2023
Biography
Yashodhan Ghorpade is an economist in the Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice of the World Bank. He joined the World Bank as a Young Professional in the Education – South Asia Team in 2016. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Sussex UK, where his research focused on the microeconomic effects of conflict and natural disasters on households in Pakistan. His research interests include the microeconomic analysis of conflict, household behavior and policy interventions in response to shocks, and child labor. He has previously worked with the International Food Policy Research Institute, the Institute of Development Studies (UK), the ILO Child Labour Program, Oxford Policy Management Ltd., and the India and Myanmar country offices of the World Bank
Citations 32 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Regional Study on Targeting Systems and Practices : Draft Policy Note
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2010-06-28) Sanchez-Paramo, Carolina; Ghorpade, Yashodhan
    This policy note aims to take stock of regional experiences in the area of targeting, both in the context of government systems and the World Bank's operational work, in South Asia. The main objectives are to review targeting systems and practices in the context of government programs; to critically review the role for and impact of targeting in the WB's operational work; and to extract lessons that can be used to deepen the relevance and impact of the WB's operational work in South Asia. The evidence presented in this note will serve as a resource for those interested in and/or planning some work on targeting related work in the region. In this sense, by presenting information on both country systems and performance of WB-led work, the note targets both practitioners and managers. The analysis focuses first on the architecture of targeting systems in South Asia, and on the determinants of targeting effectiveness, including the choice and design of the targeting tool, implementation and monitoring of the targeting tool, and the design, implementation and monitoring of the targeted program. The note concludes that international evidence a large fraction of the observed differences in targeting effectiveness across systems and programs, can be attributed to factors related to implementation and monitoring. This implies that investments aimed at correcting resource, capacity and logistic limitations in government systems could go a long way in improving targeting outcomes in the region.
  • Publication
    Ready to Learn: Before School, In School, and Beyond School in South Asia
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2020-02-19) Beteille, Tara; Tognatta, Namrata; Riboud, Michelle; Nomura, Shinsaku; Ghorpade, Yashodhan
    Countries that have sustained rapid growth over decades have typically had a strong public commitment to expanding education as well as to improving learning outcomes. South Asian countries have made considerable progress in expanding access to primary and secondary schooling, with countries having achieved near-universal enrollment of the primary-school-age cohort (ages 6–11), except for Afghanistan and Pakistan. Secondary enrollment shows an upward trend as well. Beyond school, many more people have access to skill-improving opportunities and higher education today. Although governments have consistently pursued policies to expand access, a prominent feature of the region has been the role played by non-state actors—private nonprofit and for-profit entities—in expanding access at every level of education. Though learning levels remain low, countries in the region have shown a strong commitment to improving learning. All countries in South Asia have taken the first step, which is to assess learning outcomes regularly. Since 2010, there has been a rapid increase in the number of large-scale student learning assessments conducted in the region. But to use the findings of these assessments to improve schooling, countries must build their capacity to design assessments and analyze and use findings to inform policy.
  • Publication
    Extending a Lifeline or Cutting Losses?: The Effects of Conflict on Household Receipts of Remittances in Pakistan
    (Elsevier, 2017-11) Ghorpade, Yashodhan
    The author examines the causal effects of long-term exposure to conflict, measured at the micro level, on households’ receipt of remittances, among households residing in areas affected by the 2010 floods in Pakistan. Using a dataset of 7802 households, representative of all flood-affected areas of Pakistan in 2010, IV estimation is employed to overcome the endogeneity of conflict exposure and remittance receipts, and control for a range of confounding factors. Contrary to the literature from country-level case studies, it is found that long-term exposure to conflict reduces households’ likelihood of receiving any remittances at all, as well as the average amounts of remittances received. However for households in the lowest food consumption expenditure quintile, conflict has a positive effect on the likelihood of remittance receipts, which provides evidence for the existence of heterogeneous effects as well as a significant micro–macro gap in understanding the causal effects of conflict on remittance receipts.