Person:
Ghorpade, Yashodhan

Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice
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Social protection, Poverty, Conflict
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Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice
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Last updated: December 14, 2023
Biography
Yashodhan Ghorpade is an economist in the Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice of the World Bank. He joined the World Bank as a Young Professional in the Education – South Asia Team in 2016. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Sussex UK, where his research focused on the microeconomic effects of conflict and natural disasters on households in Pakistan. His research interests include the microeconomic analysis of conflict, household behavior and policy interventions in response to shocks, and child labor. He has previously worked with the International Food Policy Research Institute, the Institute of Development Studies (UK), the ILO Child Labour Program, Oxford Policy Management Ltd., and the India and Myanmar country offices of the World Bank
Citations 32 Scopus

Publication Search Results

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Can Rigorous Impact Evaluations Improve Humanitarian Assistance?

2017-10-24, Puri, Jyotsna, Aladysheva, Anastasia, Iversen, Vegard, Ghorpade, Yashodhan, Bruck, Tilman

Each year billions of US-dollars of humanitarian assistance are mobilised in response to man-made emergencies and natural disasters. Yet, rigorous evidence for how best to intervene remains scant. This dearth reflects that rigorous impact evaluations of humanitarian assistance pose major methodological, practical and ethical challenges. While theory-based impact evaluations can crucially inform humanitarian programming, popular methods, such as orthodox RCTs, are less suitable. Instead, factorial designs and quasi-experimental designs can be ethical and robust, answering questions about how to improve the delivery of assistance. We argue that it helps to be prepared, planning impact evaluations before the onset of emergencies.

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Social Protection at the Humanitarian-Development Nexus: Insights from Yemen

2021-04, Ghorpade, Yashodhan

In its seventh year of conflict, facing successive shocks and a heightened risk of famine, Yemen has been termed the world’s ‘worst humanitarian crisis.’ Against this backdrop, there has been a drastic transformation of Yemen’s social protection landscape, with the disruption of several governmental SP programs, the continued functioning of some national institutions and a massive increase in humanitarian assistance programs. In this paper, authors first review conceptual differences between humanitarian and development assistance along several features, also noting the blurring of sharp distinctions. The authors then assess the institutional landscape of social assistance in Yemen, using a unique dataset authors collated using administrative data from a range of humanitarian and development agencies. The authors compare programs in terms of scale, geographical coverage, average benefit levels, and targeting. The authors find that while there are important differences between humanitarian and development approaches, there are also many areas of convergence. While the total number of people covered by all humanitarian and development assistance programs exceeds the national population, authors also find evidence of likely exclusion of many poor households, suggesting that there is significant scope to reduce exclusion through improved coordination. The paper concludes with a discussion of areas and specific proposals for enhanced humanitarian-development coordination in the social assistance space at the strategic, program, and delivery-systems levels.