Person:
Griffith, Breda

Growth and Competitiveness Group, World Bank Institute
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macroeconomics; regional economics; entrepreneurship; small business
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Growth and Competitiveness Group, World Bank Institute
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Last updated: January 31, 2023
Biography
Breda Griffith has worked as a consultant with WBI since 2005 in the areas of growth, poverty, gender, development, and labor markets. She has publications in refereed journals on development and language maintenance, entrepreneurship, and small business. Breda has also co-authored books on economic growth, poverty, gender and macroeconomic policy, new directions in development, labor markets in developing countries, and geography of growth. Previously she was a lecturer in DCU Business School, Dublin, Ireland and a Researcher at Queensland Treasury, Brisbane, Australia.

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Gender and Macroeconomic Policy

2011-01-05, Nallari, Raj, Griffith, Breda

This report aims to show how macroeconomic policies create differential opportunities for women and men. This volume comprises nine chapters covering four broad themes: gender as a category of analysis in macroeconomics; the implications of gender for macroeconomic aggregates, in particular consumption and economic growth; the role of gender in the labor market, globalization, and access to credit; and gender budgeting. Chapters one and two address the first theme. Chapter one focuses on the macroeconomic cost to growth and development that arises from rigid gender roles and associated gender asymmetries. Chapter two documents the progress made in gender mainstreaming by highlighting developments in data collection and monitoring that have moved beyond simply disaggregating data by male and female. Chapters three and four cover the second theme. Chapter three considers the role of gender relations in the macroeconomic aggregates of consumption, savings, investment, and government expenditure and the implications for macroeconomic policy in these areas. Chapter four examines gender relations and economic growth. Chapters five through seven focus on the third theme. Chapter five examines the labor market. Chapter six examines how globalization affects gender relations, particularly employment. Chapter seven concentrates on women's access to finance and documents gender asymmetries in this market. Chapter eight, on the fourth theme, highlights the impact fiscal policies have on gender relations. It documents how policy can be made more gender specific and reports on the progress made by countries that have adopted gender-responsive government budgeting. Chapter nine summarizes what is known about gender and macroeconomic policy, noting areas in which the literature is well developed as well as areas that require further research and study.