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Lanjouw, Peter Frederik

Poverty and Inequality Team, Development Economics Research Group, World Bank
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Poverty and Inequality Analysis; Rural Development; Small Area Estimation; Village Studies
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Poverty and Inequality Team, Development Economics Research Group, World Bank
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Last updated January 31, 2023
Biography
Peter Lanjouw, a Dutch national, is Research Manager of the Poverty and Inequality Team in the Development Economics Research Group of the World Bank. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the Amsterdam Institute of International Development, Netherlands. He completed his Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics in 1992. From August 2003 until August 2005, he was a visiting scholar at the Agriculture and Resource Economics department at UC Berkeley, and he held the appointment of Professor of Economics at the VU University of Amsterdam between September 1998 and May 2000. He has taught in the Masters in Development Economics program at the University of Namur, Belgium and has also taught at the Foundation for the Advanced Study of International Development in Tokyo, Japan. His research focuses on various aspects of poverty and inequality measurement as well as on rural development issues.  
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Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
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    How Good Is a Map? Putting Small Area Estimation to the Test
    ( 2008) Demombynes, Gabriel ; Elbers, Chris ; Lanjouw, Jean O. ; Lanjouw, Peter
    This paper examines the performance small area of welfare estimation. The method combines census and survey data to produce spatially disaggregated poverty and inequality estimates. To test the method, predicted welfare indicators for a set of target populations are compared with their true values. The target populations are constructed using actual data from a census of households in a set of rural Mexican communities. Estimates are examined along three criteria: accuracy of confidence intervals, bias and correlation with true values. We find that while point estimates are very stable, the precision of the estimates varies with alternative simulation methods. Precision of estimates is shown to diminish markedly if unobserved location effects at the village level are not well captured in underlying consumption models. With well specified models there is only slight evidence of bias, but we show that bias increases if underlying models fail to capture latent location effects.
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    Publication
    How Good a Map? Putting Small Area Estimation to the Test
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2007-03) Demombynes, Gabriel ; Elbers, Chris ; Lanjouw, Jean O. ; Lanjouw, Peter
    The authors examine the performance of small area welfare estimation. The method combines census and survey data to produce spatially disaggregated poverty and inequality estimates. To test the method, they compare predicted welfare indicators for a set of target populations with their true values. They construct target populations using actual data from a census of households in a set of rural Mexican communities. They examine estimates along three criteria: accuracy of confidence intervals, bias, and correlation with true values. The authors find that while point estimates are very stable, the precision of the estimates varies with alternative simulation methods. While the original approach of numerical gradient estimation yields standard errors that seem appropriate, some computationally less-intensive simulation procedures yield confidence intervals that are slightly too narrow. The precision of estimates is shown to diminish markedly if unobserved location effects at the village level are not well captured in underlying consumption models. With well specified models there is only slight evidence of bias, but the authors show that bias increases if underlying models fail to capture latent location effects. Correlations between estimated and true welfare at the local level are highest for mean expenditure and poverty measures and lower for inequality measures.