Person:
Rentschler, Jun

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Economics of Development, Environment, and Climate
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Last updated: November 16, 2023
Biography
Jun Rentschler is a Senior Economist at the Office of the Chief Economist for Sustainable Development, working at the intersection of climate change and sustainable resilient development. Prior to joining The World Bank in 2012, he served as an Economic Adviser at the German Foreign Ministry. He also spent two years at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) working on private sector investment projects in resource efficiency and climate change. Before that he worked on projects with Grameen Microfinance Bank in Bangladesh and the Partners for Financial Stability Program by USAID in Poland. He is a Visiting Fellow at the Payne Institute for Public Policy, following previous affiliations with the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies and the Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo. Jun holds a PhD in Economics from University College London (UCL), specializing in development, climate, and energy.
Citations 78 Scopus

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Air Pollution and Poverty: PM2.5 Exposure in 211 Countries and Territories
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-04) Rentschler, Jun
    Air pollution is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, especially affecting poorer people who tend to be more exposed and vulnerable. This study contributes (i) updated global exposure estimates for the World Health Organizations's 2021 revised fine particulate matter (PM2.5) thresholds, and (ii) estimates of the number of poor people exposed to unsafe PM2.5 concentrations. It shows that 7.28 billion people, or 94 percent of the world population, are directly exposed to unsafe average annual PM2.5 concentrations. Low- and middle-income countries account for 80 percent of people exposed to unsafe PM2.5 levels. Moreover, 716 million poor people (living on less than $1.90 per day) live in areas with unsafe air pollution. Around half of them are located in just three countries: India, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Air pollution levels are particularly high in lower-middle-income countries, where economies tend to rely more heavily on polluting industries and technologies. The findings are based on high-resolution air pollution and population maps with global coverage, as well as subnational poverty estimates based on harmonized household surveys.
  • Publication
    Frontline: Preparing Healthcare Systems for Shocks from Disasters to Pandemics
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-04-12) Rentschler, Jun; Tariverdi, Mersedeh; Desjonqueres, Chloe; Mercadante, Jared
    Healthcare systems are at the frontline of delivering critical care during emergencies. Yet, already before the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries were struggling to meet even routine demands for health care. Climate change, disasters, pandemics, and demographic changes will increase pressures on already strained health systems. To strengthen the resilience of health systems to shocks and pressures, this note outlines five principles and priority areas for action. (1) Foundations: Building the capacity of health systems to effectively manage routine demands is a prerequisite for increasing their resilience to shocks. (2) Health care facilities: Facilities must be prepared to meet surge demand during emergencies and protected against shocks, such as earthquakes or floods. (3) Health care systems: Coordinated regional and system-level responses and flexible solutions are key during emergencies. (4) National emergency management: Crisis response by the health sector must be coordinated with emergency management systems, including civil protection and risk financing. (5) Quality infrastructure: Resilient water, electricity, transport, and digital systems are essential for effective health services. The principles presented in this note can help to better prepare health systems to respond to a wide range of shocks, from seasonal demand surges, to pandemics, climate change, and disasters.