Person:
Bhada-Tata, Perinaz

Urbanization and Resilience Management Unit, World Bank
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Fields of Specialization
Solid waste management; solid waste; urbanization; urban environment; cities and climate change
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Urbanization and Resilience Management Unit, World Bank
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Last updated: January 31, 2023
Biography
Perinaz Bhada-Tata is an independent consultant working on issues related to solid waste management, cities, and climate change.  She was previously a Junior Professional Associate in the Urban Development Unit at the World Bank.  Perinaz received her MS in Earth Resources Engineering and Master of International Affairs degree in Environmental Policy at Columbia University in New York.  At Columbia, conducted research on the feasibility of introducing waste-to-energy technology in Mumbai in order to combat the growing garbage problem and to provide a supplemental source of energy.  Perinaz has also worked at NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York and Dewey Ballantine.  She received her BA from Franklin & Marshall College.

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    What a Waste : A Global Review of Solid Waste Management
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2012-03) Hoornweg, Daniel; Bhada-Tata, Perinaz
    Solid waste management is the one thing just about every city government provides for its residents. While service levels, environmental impacts and costs vary dramatically, solid waste management is arguably the most important municipal service and serves as a prerequisite for other municipal action. As the world hurtles toward its urban future, the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW), one of the most important by-products of an urban lifestyle, is growing even faster than the rate of urbanization. Ten years ago there were 2.9 billion urban residents who generated about 0.64 kg of MSW per person per day (0.68 billion tonnes per year). This report estimates that today these amounts have increased to about 3 billion residents generating 1.2 kg per person per day (1.3 billion tonnes per year). By 2025 this will likely increase to 4.3 billion urban residents generating about 1.42 kg/capita/day of municipal solid waste (2.2 billion tonnes per year).
  • Publication
    Decision Maker’s Guides for Solid Waste Management Technologies
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2018-09) Kaza, Silpa; Bhada-Tata, Perinaz
    The Decision Maker’s Guides for Solid Waste Management Technologies were created to help mayors and decision makers understand the various technologies and when they would be appropriate based on local circumstances. Mayors are often approached by different solid waste management technology vendors and these guides aim to provide objective guidance and critical considerations. They offer insights into implementing environmentally sound treatment and disposal solutions. The guides include: (i) A basic description of what each technology is and how it works; (ii) Key considerations when thinking about pursuing a specific technology; (iii) Financial implications and suggestions for reducing and recovering costs; (iv) Examples of where the technology has succeeded and failed; and (v) Questions to ask the solid waste vendor to assess appropriateness of the technology and vendor for the local context.
  • Publication
    Cities and Climate Change : Responding to an Urgent Agenda
    (World Bank, 2011-06-02) Hoornweg, Daniel; Freire, Mila; Lee, Marcus J.; Bhada-Tata, Perinaz; Yuen, Belinda
    The 5th urban research symposium on cities and climate change responding to an urgent agenda, held in Marseille in June 2009, sought to highlight how climate change and urbanization are converging to create one of the greatest challenges of our time. Cities consume much of the world's energy, and thus produce much of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. Yet cities, to varying extents, are also vulnerable to climate change impacts, with poor populations facing the greatest risk. Thus, adaptation and increased resilience constitute priorities for every city, and cities have a key role to play in mitigating climate change. Climate change mitigation and adaptation in cities has emerged as a new theme on the global agenda, creating a strong desire among governments, the private sector, and the academic community worldwide to learn from experiences and good practice examples. The 5th urban research symposium made an important contribution to the growing body of knowledge and practice in the area of cities and climate change. During the three-day symposium, approximately 200 papers were presented to more than 700 participants representing more than 70 countries. As co-organizers, the authors found it very rewarding to have such an audience and to see the wide range of topics discussed, from indicators and measurement to institutions and governance. This publication is comprised of an edited selection of the many papers submitted to the symposium and gives a flavor of the questions asked and possible answers. (The entire collection of symposium papers is available as an online resource for interested readers.) The authors look forward to the benefits that the knowledge gained and the partnerships forged during the symposium will have for global efforts on cities and climate change.
  • Publication
    The Global City Indicators Program : A More Credible Voice for Cities
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-06) Bhada, Perinaz
    The Global City Indicators Program (GCIP) is a decentralized, city-led initiative that enables cities to measure, report, and improve their performance and quality of life, facilitate capacity building, and share best practices through an easy-to-use web portal. Managing cities effectively is critical and becoming more complex as population growth and economic development are taking place in urban areas. Today's big challenges, such as poverty reduction, economic development, climate change, and the creation and maintenance of an inclusive and peaceful society, will all need to be met through the responses of cities. So too will the day-to-day challenges of garbage collection, responding to the house on fire and larger disasters, and facilitating the provision of water, electricity, education, health care, and the myriad of other services that make life more productive and enjoyable. Standardized indicators are essential in order to measure the performance of cities, capture trends and developments, and support cities in becoming global partners.
  • Publication
    What a Waste 2.0: A Global Snapshot of Solid Waste Management to 2050
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2018-09-20) Kaza, Silpa; Yao, Lisa C.; Bhada-Tata, Perinaz; Van Woerden, Frank; Ionkova, Kremena; Morton, John; Poveda, Renan Alberto; Sarraf, Maria; Malkawi, Fuad; Harinath, A.S.; Banna, Farouk; An, Gyongshim; Imoto, Haruka; Levine, Daniel
    By 2050, the world is expected to generate 3.40 billion tons of waste annually, increasing drastically from today’s 2.01 billion tons. What a Waste 2.0: A Global Snapshot of Solid Waste Management to 2050 aggregates extensive solid waste data at the national and urban levels. It estimates and projects waste generation to 2030 and 2050. Beyond the core data metrics from waste generation to disposal, the report provides information on waste management costs, revenues, and tariffs; special wastes; regulations; public communication; administrative and operational models; and the informal sector.