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Now showing 1 - 10 of 53
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    Tanzania Country Program Evaluation: Approach Paper
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-10-03) Independent Evaluation Group
    The Country Program Evaluation (CPE) for Tanzania assesses the World Bank Group’s effectiveness and relevance in its work to help Tanzania address its key development challenges. The CPE will encompass two Bank Group strategy periods covering fiscal years (FY)12–16 and FY18–22. The evaluation aims to inform the next Bank Group Country Partnership Framework for Tanzania.
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    Rwanda Country Program Evaluation FY09-17: An Independent Evaluation
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-03-14) Independent Evaluation Group
    The World Bank Group's positioning in relation to Rwanda's Vision 2020 goal of rapidly attaining Middle-Income Country (MIC) status reflected many of the elements that are critical to realizing the country's goal: (i) Under a first pillar of promoting economic transformation for sustained growth, it supported infrastructure (notably energy and transport); the business environment (including skills development); the financial sector (including rural finance); and in the latter years the urban sector. (ii) Under a second pillar of reducing social vulnerability and raising the productivity and incomes of the poor, it supported agriculture; health (initially); and social protection—including demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants. (iii) A third accountable governance pillar aimed to strengthen central and decentralized public financial management (PFM). This evaluation assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group's country program in Rwanda over the period FY09-17. The report aims to inform future partnership frameworks between the World Bank Group and the Rwandan Government. The report is also of interest to individuals and organizations working with countries striving to consolidate economic progress after a successful transition from conflict, or countries striving to reach middle-income country (MIC) status.
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    Learning from IDA Experience: Lessons from IEG Evaluations
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2016) Independent Evaluation Group
    At the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015, world leaders endorsed 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a successor framework to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Placing economic, social, and environmental sustainability at the center of development, the new agenda has the potential for a historic shift in achieving the goal of ending poverty and promoting shared prosperity. Within this changed and changing context, the operations and modus operandi of the International Development Association (IDA) are being examined. As the world’s largest provider of financial resources to the poorest countries, it is expected to deliver greater results in the new development paradigm. In line with the commitment to learning from the past, this synthesis report presents findings from recent evaluations and analysis from the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG). Focusing on the special themes under IDA16 and IDA17, it aims to offer evaluation evidence on what has and has not worked in IDA priority areas in order to support the IDA18 replenishment discussions.
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    The Imperative of Skills Development for the Structural Transformation of Sub-Saharan Africa: Potential for China-World Bank-Africa Collaboration
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015-05) Bashir, Sajitha
    This paper proposes three ways in which China and the World Bank could collaborate in the area of skills development in Africa, building on the experience of both and recent efforts at collaboration. First, under the PASET initiative, China and the World Bank could undertake joint analytical work to assess the skills needs for different sectors in individual countries, continue the benchmarking of African universities piloted with Shanghai Jiao Tong University, share the development experience of China through targeted learning visits, and share experiences in skills development through regional forums. Second, China could support the regional initiatives of the PASET such as the establishment of the Regional Scholarship Fund for postgraduate studies in applied sciences, engineering and technology; the proposed regional TVET centres of excellence; and co-financing of the regional Africa Centres of Excellence project, currently financed by the World Bank. This would supplement China’s on-going investments, which could also benefit from the experience of well-designed programs with strong monitoring and evaluation. Third, China could co-finance country-level projects which are being prepared with World Bank assistance, focusing on technical/vocational and higher education. This will enable Chinese Ministries and institutions to learn from the experience of the World Bank and contribute to the development of the education and training system in Sub-Saharan African countries, while also contributing China’s experience in a concrete fashion.
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    Guinea-Bissau: The World Bank Group Country Opinion Survey FY 2014
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015-02) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Guinea-Bissau assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Guinea-Bissau perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Guinea-Bissau on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Guinea-Bissau; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Guinea-Bissau; 3) overall impressions of the WBG’s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Guinea-Bissau; and 4) their perceptions of the WBG’s future role in Guinea-Bissau.
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    World Bank Group Engagement in Resource-Rich Developing Countries: The Cases of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015) Independent Evaluation Group
    This report by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) summarizes the experiences of and draws lessons from the country program evaluations of four natural resource-rich countries: the Plurinational State of Bolivia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Zambia. It concludes that although the challenges identified in these countries are not unique, they manifest themselves with particular intensity in three closely interrelated areas that need to be defined and structured as a coherent strategy: (i) management of revenues from an exhaustible resource; (ii) growth and employment in the non-extractive sectors, and (iii) inclusive growth and reduction of poverty. Overall, looking at the four resource-rich countries in this evaluation, one does not see the World Bank Group as having a consistent framework for engagement, driven by the defining characteristics of these countries—their rich endowment with non-renewable natural resources and dependence on revenues from their exploitation. Each of the four stories evolved in a unique way that depended on how the country teams decided to react to differing country circumstances. The main challenge for the Bank Group in these countries today is how to stay relevant and competitive, as its value proposition is no longer its financial resources, but its knowledge and global experience, which may call for a more modest scope of interventions while keeping the focus on key challenges.
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    Zambia Country Program Evaluation FY04-13: An Independent Evaluation
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015) Independent Evaluation Group
    From 2004 to 2012, Zambia experienced a combination of good economic policies and high rates of growth not seen since the early years after its independence. While growth was mainly driven by rising copper prices, other factors contributed to Zambia’s ability to take advantage of this growth. The international debt relief programs in 2004-2005 almost eliminated public debt and provided the fiscal space for selective, high-priority investments and expanded social programs. The privatization of the copper mines brought new investment in rehabilitation and expansion of production. The period also saw a substantial expansion of primary education and progress in dealing with the most pervasive public health problems. These positive developments set the stage for Zambia to tackle its pervasive poverty. In practice, however, sustained growth over the period has led to little poverty reduction, especially in rural areas of the country. The Bank Group and other donors provided critical support at the beginning of the evaluation period, when Zambia’s debt level became unsustainable. The Bank provided substantial support for capacity development and better functioning institutions. The Bank’s efforts to strengthen public administration and improve governance met with some partial successes in enhanced audit and procurement capacity, and the achievement of Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative compliance. However, despite nearly a decade of implementation, the Integrated Financial Management Information Systems (IFMIS), is still only partially operational. Further, the Zambian government has not followed through on its positive discourse regarding decentralization of government authority.
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    Senegal: The World Bank Group Country Opinion Survey FY 2014
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015-01) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Senegal assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Senegal perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Senegal on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Senegal; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Senegal; 3) overall impressions of the WBG’s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Senegal; and 4) their perceptions of the WBG’s future role in Senegal.
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    Madagascar: The World Bank Group Country Opinion Survey FY 2014
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2015-01) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Madagascar assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Madagascar perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral and bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Madagascar on: 1) their views regarding the general environment in Madagascar; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Madagascar; 3) overall impressions of the WBGs effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Madagascar; and 4) their perceptions of the WBGs future role in Madagascar.
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    Liberia: The World Bank Group Country Opinion Survey FY 2014
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2014-12) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Liberia assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Liberia perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral and bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Liberia on: 1) their views regarding the general environment in Liberia; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Liberia; 3) overall impressions of the WBGs effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Liberia; and 4) their perceptions of the WBGs future role in Liberia.