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    FY 2022 Bangladesh Country Opinion Survey Report
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2022-05) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Bangladesh assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Bangladesh perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral and bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Bangladesh on: (1) their views regarding the general environment in Bangladesh; (2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Bangladesh; (3) overall impressions of the WBG’s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Bangladesh; and (4) their perceptions of the WBG’s future role in Bangladesh.
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    The World Bank Group in Bangladesh, Fiscal Years 2011–20: Country Program Evaluation
    (Washington, DC : World Bank, 2022) Independent Evaluation Group
    This Country Program Evaluation (CPE) assesses the development effectiveness of the World Bank Group’s engagement with Bangladesh during the past decade (fiscal year [FY]11–20) and provides lessons to inform the next Bank Group supported strategy with Bangladesh and to countries facing similar challenges. The Bank Group made important contributions over the past decade to help Bangladesh address several of its development challenges. Most notable include increasing power generation capacity, improving access to clean energy, all season roads, primary and secondary education, reducing child and maternal mortality and improving financial inclusion. However, achievements fell short in several areas, including insufficient investment in data and measurement particularly on learning outcomes and limited progress on regional connectivity. In other areas, domestic vested interests prevailed resulting in little progress in improving the business environment, natural resource management, banking reform and tariff reform. Bank Group support adapted in response to changing circumstances following the Padma Bridge cancellation by reallocating resources to sectors in which the Bank Group had more traction and a long-standing history of effective engagement. However, rising fiscal vulnerabilities received insufficient attention. Despite a deteriorating trend in institutional quality and economic management and declining core IDA allocation, the Bank Group significantly increased financing to Bangladesh, including through IDA’s Scale Up Facility. Key lessons include: (i) Rebalancing the portfolio in the face of a difficult political economy helped the Bank Group remain relevant in Bangladesh; (ii) Where reform is deemed critical to sustain development progress but government commitment is weak or absent, continued targeted analysis of key development constraints can help prepare the ground for future action when a window of opportunity presents itself; (iii) Measuring improvements in the quality of education requires deliberate and ongoing investment in data collection; (iv) Increasing overall IDA financing in the context of deteriorating CPIA rating raises a question about the significance that IDA assigns to measures of institutional quality and governance; (v) Given underlying concerns with data quality and coverage, the World Bank might have been more qualified in its public statements about the quality of the macroeconomic framework; and (vi) Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) arrangements between the World Bank and the IMF constrain the ability of the World Bank to provide comprehensive and timely assessments of financial sector vulnerabilities in nonsystematically important economies.
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    World Bank Group Climate Change Action Plan 2021-2025: South Asia Roadmap
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-10-05) World Bank Group
    South Asia is one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change. The people of South Asia are living through a "new climate normal," where intensifying heat waves, cyclones, droughts, and floods are testing the limits of governments, businesses, and citizens to adapt. Jacobabad in Pakistan's Sindh province was, this year, the hottest city on the planet with temperatures higher than the human body can handle. In 2020, more than three million people were evacuated to safety from the fury of Super Cyclone Amphan. At the same time, South Asia has an unfinished development agenda with legitimate aspirations to reach middle income status in the foreseeable future, which will include increasing access to energy, increasing rural incomes and managing large scale urbanization, among others. The success with which South Asian countries navigate these development transitions, while also reducing emissions and increasing climate resilience, will determine the region's ability to lift millions from the threat of poverty and vulnerability, and help the world to secure the overall climate transition.
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    FY2019 Bangladesh Country Opinion Survey Report
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-07) World Bank Group
    The country opinion survey in Bangladesh assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Bangladesh perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral and bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Bangladesh on: (1) their views regarding the general environment in Bangladesh; (2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Bangladesh; (3) overall impressions of the WBG’s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Bangladesh; and (4) their perceptions of the WBG’s future role in Bangladesh.
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    FY16 Bangladesh Country Opinion Survey Report
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2017-03) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey in Bangladesh assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Bangladesh perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Bangladesh on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Bangladesh; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Bangladesh; 3) overall impressions of the WBG’s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Bangladesh; and 4) their perceptions of the WBG’s future role in Bangladesh.
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    Bangladesh Country Opinion Survey Report (July 2013 - June 2014)
    (Washington, DC, 2014-03-14) World Bank Group
    The Country Opinion Survey for FY2012 in Bangladesh assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Bangladesh perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Bangladesh on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Bangladesh; 2) their overall attitudes toward the WBG in Bangladesh; 3) overall impressions of the WBG s effectiveness and results, knowledge work and activities, and communication and information sharing in Bangladesh; and 4) their perceptions of the WBG s future role in Bangladesh.
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    Bangladesh: World Bank Country-Level Engagement on Governance and Anticorruption
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2011-12) Wescott, Clay ; Breeding, Mary ; Breeding, Mary E.
    Bangladesh is one of the world's poorest and most densely populated countries, and subject to annual cyclones and flooding. Despite these challenges, it benefits from strong economic growth, good performance on health and education, and poverty reduction, alongside weak governance and pervasive corruption. The reasons include strong macroeconomic policy, pro-poor spending, credible elections, export growth and remittances, improved capacity for managing natural disasters, and a stronger civil society than comparable countries. After over a decade of intense engagement with the Bank on governance, Bangladesh adopted in 2006 a governance-oriented Country Assistance Strategy (CAS) with four main objectives: to improve implementation capacity; to 'tackle corruption' by fully operationalizing the Anti-Corruption Commission; to lay the foundation for comprehensive legal and judicial reform; and to strengthen 'voice, empowerment and participation.' The choice of a wide range of instruments and areas of intervention was appropriate, given the political instability at the time of 2006 CAS preparation. The Bank signaled it was ready to engage in all areas, and could scale up or pull back depending on emerging political and bureaucratic commitment. The 2006 CAS yielded mixed results, and the subsequent Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) has been more selective on GAC issues. At the project level, governance has been a key priority, in line with the South Asia region's heavy emphasis on GAC-in-Projects. Investments in GAC-in-primary education, a local government project, anti-corruption efforts in the power sector, and projects strengthening the investment climate have yielded positive results. Investments in GAC-in-roads projects have had mixed results in terms of effectiveness. GAC activities were mainly adopted prior to the 2007 GAC strategy. Although Bangladesh was a Country Governance and Anticorruption (CGAC) country, the country team chose not to use CGAC funds because the country had already been intensively using GAC approaches well before the GAC strategy was adopted.
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    Donor Coordination and Harmonization in Bangladesh: A Joint Evaluation Paper
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2010-01-28) Thornton, Paul ; Kolkma, Walter ; Fostvedt, Nils
    In recent years, issues of aid effectiveness have come centre stage, motivated amongst other factors by the increased emphasis on impact evidenced in particular by the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Improved aid alignment and harmonization (A&H) is seen as vital for enhanced aid effectiveness, as reflected most prominently in the 2005 Paris Declaration. In this context, this Joint Evaluation Paper (JEP) addresses key aspects of donor coordination and harmonization in Bangladesh. The subject of the JEP is the Joint Strategic Framework (JSF) of the four largest aid donors in Bangladesh the World Bank (WB), Asian Development Bank (ADB), Department for International Development (DFID), and Japan. At the time it was started around 2005, the JSF was considered a major step forward in aid A&H, and as such merits serious joint evaluation.
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    Do Health Sector-Wide Approaches Achieve Results?: Emerging Evidence and Lessons from Six Countries
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2009) Vaillancourt, Denise
    This technical paper distills the emerging experience and lessons of Sector-wide Approaches (SWAps) in the health sector, supported by the World Bank and other Development Partners (DPs), in six countries: Bangladesh, Ghana, Kyrgyz Republic, Nepal, Malawi and Tanzania. It draws on the findings of Project Performance Assessment Reports (PPARs) conducted by the Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) on health SWAp support operations in Bangladesh, Ghana and the Kyrgyz Republic, and of field-based case studies that assessed the Bank's lending and non-lending support to Health, Population and Nutrition (HNP) in Malawi and Nepal, where SWAps are more recent. This paper also incorporates the findings of an evaluation of Tanzania's health SWAp, commissioned by the Government of Tanzania, and financed by DPs. The design, substantiation, and validation of the findings and lessons of this study have benefited from a review of the SWAp literature and vetting of preliminary findings and lessons with SWAp practitioners. This study grew out of the SWAp portfolio review and the distillation of health SWAp experience to date, undertaken as input to IEG's recent evaluation of the World Bank's support to HNP, improving effectiveness and outcomes for the poor in health, nutrition and population: an evaluation of World Bank Group support since 1997. The paucity of health SWAp evaluations in the literature, the richness and complexity of the preliminary findings, and the strong demand, inside and outside of the Bank for more distillation of SWAp experience and lessons all were justification for the undertaking of a more in-depth analysis.
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    Maintaining Momentum to 2015 : An Impact Evaluation of Interventions to Improve Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition in Bangladesh
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2005) Operations Evaluation Department
    This report addresses the issue of what publicly-supported programs and external assistance from the Bank and other agencies can do to accelerate attainment of targets such as reducing infant mortality by two-thirds. The evidence presented here relates to Bangladesh, a country which has made spectacular progress but needs to maintain momentum in order to achieve its own poverty reduction goals. The report addresses the following issues: (1) What has happened to child health and nutrition outcomes and fertility in Bangladesh since 1990? Are the poor sharing in the progress which is being made? (2) What have been the main determinants of maternal and child health outcomes in Bangladesh over this period? (3) Given these determinants, what can be said about the impact of publicly and externally-supported programs - notably those of the World Bank and DFID - to improve health and nutrition? (4) To the extent that interventions have brought about positive impacts, have they done so in a cost effective manner?