Law, Justice, and Development

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The Law, Justice, and Development series is offered by the Legal Vice Presidency of the World Bank to provide insights into aspects of law and justice that are relevant to the development process. Works in the series present new legal and judicial reform activities related to the World Bank’s work, as well as analyses of domestic and international law. The series is intended to be accessible to a broad audience as well as to legal practitioners.

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  • Publication
    The World Bank Legal Review, Volume 5 : Fostering Development through Opportunity, Inclusion, and Equity
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2014) Cissé, Hassane; Menon, N. R. Madhava; Cordonier Segger, Marie-Claire; Nmehielle, Vincent O.; Cissé, Hassane; Menon, N. R. Madhava; Cordonier Segger, Marie-Claire; Nmehielle, Vincent O.
    This report speaks to the holistic nature of the development process, a process that should not only encourage all stakeholders to participate in the process but also directly engage them. This volume posits that such participation must be guided by the law and accord with the broader notion of justice for development as a concept to be meaningfully appreciated today. A process that takes place without giving stakeholders an opportunity to participate, or that excludes stakeholders, is not only an unfair and inequitable process but also one that is likely to fall foul of the notion of justice in a society that is governed by the rule of law. Thus, equitable participation necessitates a careful inquiry into the conceptual underpinnings of opportunity, inclusion, and equity as law and justice tools that can be used to secure elements of meaningful development. Opportunity, inclusion, and equity in global development are clearly the foundation stones of the millennium development goals (MDGs), and their importance is growing yet greater in the context of a new post-2015 sustainable development agenda that builds on the gains of implementing the eight MDGs while identifying new development challenges. This volume is made up of 32 chapters organized into five thematic parts. Part one is law and the economy; part two is justice and rule of law reform; part three is environmental and natural resources law; part four is governance and anticorruption; and part five is empowerment and equity for diverse communities. The volume ends with a concluding chapter and an afterword.
  • Publication
    The World Bank Legal Review, Volume 4 : Legal Innovation and Empowerment for Development
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2013) Cissé, Hassane; Muller, Sam; Thomas, Chantal; Wang, Chenguang; Cissé, Hassane; Muller, Sam; Thomas, Chantal; Wang, Chenguang
    The World Bank legal review gathers this input from around the world and compiles it into a useful resource for all development practitioners and scholars. The subtitle of this volume, legal innovation and empowerment for development, highlights how the law can respond to the chal-lenges posed to development objectives in a world slowly emerging from an economic crisis. The focus on innovation is a call for new, imaginative strategies and ways of thinking about what the law can do in the development realm. The focus on empowerment is a deliberate attempt to place the law into the hands of the poor; to give them another tool with which to resist poverty. This volume shows some of the ways that the law can make an innovative and empowering difference in development scenarios. Development problems are complex and varied, and the theme of innovation and empowerment naturally has a broad scope. Consequently, this volume reaches far and wide. It considers the nature, promise, and limitations of legal innovation and legal empowerment. It looks at concrete examples in places such as Africa, the Asia-Pacific region, and Latin America. It considers developments in issues with universal application, such as the rights of the disabled and the effectiveness of asset recovery measures. The theme of legal innovation and empowerment for development complements substantive and institutional sensibilities in current development policy. Substantively, development policy discourse seems to have moved away from tacking hard toward statist policy or neoliberal policy. Although this brief introduction cannot do justice to the richness and complexity of these contributions, it does consider each focal point in turn.