Global Financial Development Report

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Global Financial Development Report is a new World Bank series that provides a unique contribution to financial sector policy debates, building on novel data, surveys, research, and wide-ranging country experience, with emphasis on emerging market and developing economies. Each report provides in-depth analysis and policy recommendations on a specific and important aspect of financial development. It also tracks financial systems in more than 200 economies before and during the global financial crisis. An accompanying website (www.worldbank.org/financialdevelopment) contains extensive datasets, research papers, and other background materials, as well as interactive features. The report and website will be of interest to and relevant for policy makers; staff of central banks, ministries of finance, and financial regulation agencies; nongovernmental organizations and donors; academics and other researchers and analysts; and members of the finance and development community.

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Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018: Bankers without Borders

2018, World Bank

Successful international integration has underpinned most experiences of rapid growth, shared prosperity, and reduced poverty. Perhaps no sector of the economy better illustrates the potential benefits--but also the perils--of deeper integration than banking. International banking may contribute to faster growth in two important ways: first, by making available much needed capital, expertise, and new technologies; and second, by enabling risk-sharing and diversification. But international banking is not without risks. The global financial crisis vividly demonstrated how international banks can transmit shocks across the globe. The Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018 brings to bear new evidence on the debate on the benefits and costs of international banks, particularly for developing countries. It provides evidence-based policy guidance on a range of issues that developing countries face. Countries that are open to international banking can benefit from global flows of funds, knowledge, and opportunity, but the regulatory challenges are complex and, at times, daunting. Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018 is the fourth in a World Bank series. The report also tracks financial systems in more than 200 economies before and during the global financial crisis, included in the accompanying website (www.worldbank.org/financialdevelopment). The World Bank report Bankers without Borders is not associated with the Grameen Foundation’s Bankers without Borders program, which engages volunteer consultants to donate their expertise to serve social enterprises and nonprofits in poor countries. For more information, visit: https://www.bankerswithoutborders.com.

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Global Financial Development Report 2015/2016: Long-Term Finance

2015-09-14, World Bank

Global Financial Development Report 2015/2016 is the third in a World Bank series. It provides a unique contribution to financial sector policy debates, building on novel data, surveys, research, and wide-ranging country experience, with emphasis on emerging markets and developing economies. The report’s findings and policy recommendations are relevant for policy makers; staff of central banks, ministries of finance, and financial regulation agencies; nongovernmental organizations and donors; academics and other researchers and analysts; and members of the finance and development community. This year’s report focuses on long-term finance—equity or debt financing with maturity exceeding one year—and establishes its importance for economic development. Extending the maturity structure of finance is often considered to be at the core of sustainable financial development. It is needed for private sector construction of plants and investment in machinery and equipment, as well as financing infrastructure investments. Without long-term finance households cannot invest in housing or education, or benefit from higher long-term returns on their savings. Attempts at directly boosting the supply of long-term finance have not been free of controversy, and have sometimes led to substantial costs to taxpayers. The report emphasizes that governments and international bodies must focus on reforms that help overcome market failures and institutional and policy weaknesses. They must also improve risk and information sharing, and promote financial literacy and consumer protection. The report also tracks financial systems in more than 200 economies before and during the global financial crisis.