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  • Publication
    The World Bank Annual Report 2022: Helping Countries Adapt to a Changing World
    (Washington, DC : World Bank, 2022) World Bank
    The Annual Report is prepared by the Executive Directors of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA)--collectively known as the World Bank--in accordance with the by-laws of the two institutions. The President of the IBRD and IDA and the Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors submit the Report, together with the accompanying administrative budgets and audited financial statements, to the Board of Governors.
  • Publication
    A Roadmap for Climate Action in Latin America and the Caribbean, 2021-2025
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2022) World Bank Group
    In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) the rapidly changing climate is increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme weather‑related events. The year 2020 saw the most catastrophic fire season over the Pantanal region and a record number of storms during the Atlantic cyclone season. Eta and Iota, two category 4 hurricanes, affected more than 8 million people in Central America, causing tens of billions of dollars in damage. In Honduras, annual average losses due to climate‑related shocks are estimated at 2.3 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). In rankings of the impacts of extreme weather events from 2000 to 2019, five Caribbean nations figure among the top 20 globally in terms of fatalities per capita, while in terms of economic losses as a share of GDP eight of the top 20 countries are in the Caribbean. Extreme precipitation events, which result in floods and landslides, are projected to intensify in magnitude and frequency due to climate change, with a 1.5°C increase in mean global temperature projected to result in an increase of up to 200 percent in the population affected by floods in Colombia, Brazil, and Argentina; 300 percent in Ecuador; and 400 percent in Peru. Climate shocks reduce the income of the poorest 40 percent by more than double the average of the LAC population and could push an estimated 2.4–5.8 million people in the region into extreme poverty by 2030.
  • Publication
    World Bank Group Climate Change Action Plan 2021–2025: Supporting Green, Resilient, and Inclusive Development
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06-22) World Bank Group
    The Climate Change Action Plan 2021–2025 aims to advance the climate change aspects of the WBG’s Green, Resilient, and Inclusive Development (GRID) approach, which pursues poverty eradication and shared prosperity with a sustainability lens. In the Action Plan, we will support countries and private sector clients to maximize the impact of climate finance, aiming for measurable improvements in adaptation and resilience and measurable reductions in GHG emissions. The Action Plan also considers the vital importance of natural capital, biodiversity, and ecosystems services and will increase support for nature-based solutions, given their importance for both mitigation and adaptation. As part of our effort to drive climate action, the WBG has a long-standing record of participating in key partnerships and high-level forums aimed at enhancing global efforts to address climate change. The new Action Plan represents a shift from efforts to “green” projects, to greening entire economies, and from focusing on inputs, to focusing on impacts. It focuses on (i) integrating climate and development; (ii) identifying and prioritizing action on the largest mitigation and adaptation opportunities; and (iii) using those to drive our climate finance and leverage private capital in ways that deliver the most results. That means helping the largest emitters flatten the emissions curve and accelerate the downward trend and ramping up financing on adaptation to help countries and private sector clients prepare for and adapt to climate change while pursuing broader development objectives through the GRID approach.
  • Publication
    Remarks at the G7 Leaders’ Summit Media Briefing
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-06-13) Malpass, David
    World Bank Group President David Malpass discussed talks with G7 leaders about the World Bank Group’s work on health and preparedness. The World Bank will have approved vaccination programs in over 50 countries by the end of June. He talked about the Bank’s joint work with the African Union’s Africa Vaccine Acquisition Task Team (AVATT) vaccination program. The Bank is convening a task force with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Trade Organization (WTO), and World Health Organization (WHO) to help track supplies, coordinate delivery, and accelerate deployment. He noted he would talk with G7 Leaders about the World Bank Group’s work on climate, nature-based solutions, and biodiversity.
  • Publication
    Remarks at the Leaders’ Summit on Climate
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-04-22) Malpass, David
    David Malpass, President of the World Bank, discussed the core plan of the World Bank’s climate change action plan. The World Bank Group has reached its highest-ever levels of climate finance in the past two years. The Bank plan commits to big increases in spending, focused on results, plus active private sector mobilization through International Finance Corporation (IFC) and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA), the private sector focused entities. Also, the Bank is aligning the financing flows with the Paris Agreement. The Bank goal is to provide support, and take prompt action, in ways that create the most positive impact toward green, resilient, and inclusive development.
  • Publication
    Climate Change Institutional Assessment
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2021-04-14) World Bank
    Climate change poses particularly difficult challenges for public sector institutions. Climate change impacts all sectors of the economy and society. Action to address climate change requires coordination among multiple government and nongovernment actors. The extended time frame over which climate change unfolds requires a capability to plan, implement, and sustain a credible commitment to increasingly ambitious policies over multiple political cycles. There will be winners and losers. Policies may be contested. The Climate Change Institutional Assessment (CCIA) identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the institutional framework for addressing these climate change governance challenges. The audience for the assessment is officials of center-of-government agencies responsible for policy, planning, and finance, agencies with leading roles in climate change policy, and inter-ministerial climate change bodies.
  • Publication
    Building a Green, Resilient, and Inclusive Recovery
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2021-03-29) Malpass, David
    World Bank Group President David Malpass acknowledged the importance of the United Kingdom within the World Bank Group. He spoke about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) which descended on the poor like wildfire. He highlighted the Bank's approach to the interlinked crises of green, resilient, inclusive development (GRID). The World Bank is working to help countries build “Country Platforms” to engage with wider groups of development actors as they develop the programs with Bank support. He focused on three of the most pressing challenges of climate, debt, and inequality. There is a need for integrated, long-run strategies that emphasize green, resilient, and inclusive development. He concluded we can generate a recovery that ensures a broad and lasting rise in prosperity especially for the poorest and most marginalized.
  • Publication
    Remarks at the Climate Ambition Summit 2020
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-12-12) Malpass, David
    World Bank Group President David Malpass spoke about the Climate change, poverty, and inequality–defining issues of our age. The global poor often suffer the most from climate events, including flooding, droughts and food insecurity. The World Bank Group is the biggest multilateral funder of climate investments in developing countries. Over the next five years, the Bank intends to go further, targeting thirty-five percent climate co-benefits on average across the World Bank Group. For IBRD and IDA, fifty percent of this climate finance will support adaptation and resilience. The Bank will support the Paris accord alignment by helping developing countries to achieve their NDCs, end their reliance on coal, and transition to lower-carbon, climate-resilient economies. He discussed the Coronavirus (COVID-19) response, targeting investment and policy financing that will help support a green, inclusive and resilient recovery. We cannot succeed in helping countries reduce poverty without rising to the challenges of climate change.
  • Publication
    World Bank Reference Guide to Climate Change Framework Legislation
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2020-12) World Bank
    Climate change is a grave threat to global development and shared prosperity. Its impacts are expected to intensify even as the world responds to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. The poor and most vulnerable will be the worst affected. Climate change poses particularly difficult challenges for policy makers. It demands action across all sectors of the economy and across all of society. Action to address climate change requires coordination among multiple governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders. The extended time frame over which climate change unfolds requires a capability to plan, implement, and sustain a credible commitment to increasingly ambitious policies over multiple political cycles. To address these challenges, countries need effective institutions. National framework legislation on climate change can help put these institutions in place. It can enshrine stable and ambitious targets, create mechanisms for realizing these targets, and ensure proper oversight and accountability. The authors hope the twelve key principles for framework legislation laid out in this guide will contribute to building back better by helping countries to lay a solid foundation for climate-smart development that creates new jobs and markets, boosts economic growth, and provides a safer, cleaner environment for all.
  • Publication
    Benefit Sharing at Scale: Good Practices for Results-Based Land Use Programs
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-11-01) World Bank Group
    Land use initiatives that distribute result-based payments for emission reductions need to define transparent and equitable benefit-sharing plans for how these incentives flow to a diverse range of stakeholders. This study synthesizes good practices for benefit sharing in jurisdictional land use programs that make results-based payments for emission reductions. The report draws lessons from large-scale programs and other relevant initiatives that involve benefit sharing focused on forests, land use, natural resources, and climate change. The analysis is designed to support government and program staff in developing and implementing benefit-sharing arrangements for jurisdictional level results-based land use programs, including participant countries of the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and BioCarbon Fund Initiative for Sustainable Forest Landscapes (ISFL).