Private Participation in Infrastructure Database

69 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

This series reviews new private participation in infrastructure (PPI) projects.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Private Activity in Infrastructure Slowed Down in the First Half of 2011

2012-01, World Bank

New private activity in infrastructure in developing countries declined in the first semester of 2011, but remained strong and continued to be highly selective, according to data from the private participation in infrastructure project database. Most of the new activity was concentrated in a few countries, particularly India, and Greenfield projects. In the first semester of 2011, 117 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closing in 20 low and middle-income countries. These projects involved investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$42.9 billion. Such level of activity represents a decline of 8 percent by investment and 8 percent by number of projects from the level reported in the first semester of 2010. Although investment declined from 2010, private activity in the first semester of 2011 remained high when compared with previous periods and was the fourth highest level since 2000.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments Remain at Peak Level in Europe and Central Asia While the Number of New Projects Declines

2009-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Fitzgerald, Rossa

Private activity in infrastructure in Europe and Central Asia showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. Investment in new projects slowed sharply in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. This slowdown led to a decline in the number of projects for the entire year. The region accounted for 30 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries, the largest share among developing regions. In 2008, 36 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in 11 low- or middle-income countries in the region. These involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$20.3 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$25.7 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$45.9 billion. That represented an increase of 3 percent from the level reported in 2007 and a new peak for the region. Investment in projects implemented in previous years accounted for the increase, growing by 6 percent from the level in 2007.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments to Telecommunications Continued at Peak Levels in 2008

2009-11, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Jett, Alexander N.

Investment commitments to telecommunications projects with private participation in low- and middle-income countries amounted to US$78.1 billion in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. This level of investment commitments (hereafter, investment) represents an increase of around 1 percent from the previous peak reached in 2007. As before, investment was driven by projects implemented in previous years. Projects that reached financial closure in 1990-2007 attracted investment of US$74.7 billion, while new projects implemented in 2008 accounted for US$3.4 billion. Investment in physical assets (that is, network expansion) grew by 7 percent to US$71.6 billion, reaching a new peak for the fourth consecutive year. Payments to the government (such as spectrum or concession fees and divestiture revenues) fell by 37 percent to US$6.5 billion, the lowest level since 2004. The data do not allow the separation by semester of additional investment in existing projects to see whether such investment slowed in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. But its slower growth in 2008 as a whole compared with the previous four years suggests a more cautious approach to capital expenditure.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Private Activity in Telecommunications Remained Stable in 2006

2007-11, World Bank

This note states that in 2006 investment commitments to telecommunications projects with private participation remained around the peak level reached in the previous year, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project Database. It stresses that as in previous years, stand-alone mobile and multi-service operators accounted for most of the investment and new projects in telecommunications. The concentration of activity in these segments was observed across developing region

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments and the Number of New Projects Decline in the Middle East and North Africa

2009-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Perard, Edouard

Private activity in infrastructure in the Middle East and North Africa declined sharply in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. Both investment commitments and the number of new projects declined, in both the first and second half of the year. Existing telecommunications operators accounted for most of the annual investment. The region's share of total investment commitments in developing countries in 2008 was less than 4 percent, down significantly from its 7.3 percent share in 2007. In 2008, 10 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in six low- or middle-income countries in the region. These involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$2.4 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$3.6 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$6 billion. This level represented a 49 percent drop from that in 2007 and was the lowest since 2003.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments Reach a New Peak in South Asia While the Number of New Projects Declines

2009-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Fitzgerald, Rossa

Private activity in infrastructure in South Asia showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the private participation in infrastructure project database. Investment commitments to infrastructure projects with private participation reached a new peak thanks to additional investment in existing telecommunications operators and new energy and transport projects that reached financial or contractual closure in the first half of the year. But investment in new projects slowed in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. This slowdown led to a decline in the number of projects for the entire year. The region accounted for 22 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries. In 2008, 36 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in three South Asian countries (Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan). These projects involve investment commitments of US$17.9 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$15.4 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$33.4 billion. That represented an increase of 12 percent from the level reported in 2007 and a new peak for the region. Both new and existing projects accounted for the increase. Investment in new projects increased by 8 percent from the level in 2007, while investment in existing projects rose by 18 percent.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments in Latin America and the Caribbean Increased in 2007

2008-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Jett, Alexander Nicholas

Investment commitments to infrastructure projects with private participation in Latin America and the Caribbean grew by 28 percent to US$38.3 billion in 2007, according to just-released data from the private participation in infrastructure project database. The region accounted for 24 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries. Despite having grown for four consecutive years, investment commitments remained well below the region's peak levels reached in 1997-98. Investment in 2007 was just 44 percent of the peak in 1998. Previously implemented projects largely drove the 2007 investment. Projects reaching financial or contractual closure in 1990-2006 attracted US$22.3 billion, while the 46 new projects implemented in 2007 accounted for US$16 billion. Investment in physical assets amounted to US$32.5 billion. Indeed, if only investment in physical assets were counted-that is, excluding payments to the government (such as divestiture revenues and spectrum or concession fees) investment in 2007 would be just 22 percent below the peak level of 1998.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments Remain Stable in Latin America While the Number of New Projects Declines

2009-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Jett, Alexander Nicholas

Private activity in infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. Investment in new projects slowed in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. This slowdown led to a decline in the number of projects for the entire year. The region accounted for 26 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries, the second largest share among developing regions. In 2008, 41 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in eight low- or middle-income countries in the region. These projects involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$14.6 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$25.7 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$40.3 billion. That represented an increase of 2 percent from the level reported in 2007. Investment in existing projects, up 12 percent from the level in 2007, drove the increase.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments Reach a New Peak in Sub-Saharan Africa While the Number of New Projects Declines

2009-12, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Perard, Edouard

Private activity in infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the private participation in infrastructure project database. While investment commitments to infrastructure projects with private participation reached a new peak, the number of projects reaching closure continued to decline. Existing telecommunications operators accounted for most regional investment as well as the growth in investment. The region accounted for almost 9 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries. In 2008, 15 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in 10 low- or middle-income countries in the region. These involve investment commitments of US$2.7 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$10.8 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$13.5 billion. That total represented an increase of 10 percent from the level reported in 2007 and a new peak for the region. Investment in existing projects accounted for the increase, growing by 22 percent from the level in 2007. By contrast, investment in new projects fell by 22 percent.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Investment Commitments to Telecommunications Reached a New Peak in 2007

2008-10, Izaguirre, Ada Karina, Perard, Edouard

This note states that investment commitments to telecommunications projects with private participation in low- and middle-income countries amounted to US$75 billion in 2007, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project Database. That marked a new peak for the 1990-2007 periods. In 2007, 29 telecommunications projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in 28 low- and middle-income countries. Of these projects, 23 were greenfield merchant projects, involving investment of US$3.1 billion, and 6 were divestitures, with US$1.4 billion. Previously implemented greenfield projects accounted for another US$46.9 billion, and previously divested companies for US$23.6 billion. Four telecommunications projects were canceled or became distressed in 2007, bringing the total number to 42. These 42 contracts represent 5 percent of all telecommunications projects and 4 percent of investment commitments during 1990-2007. The report concludes, no telecommunications projects were concluded in 2007.