Private Participation in Infrastructure Database

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This series reviews new private participation in infrastructure (PPI) projects.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Investment Commitments Remain Stable in Latin America While the Number of New Projects Declines
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-12) Izaguirre, Ada Karina; Jett, Alexander Nicholas
    Private activity in infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. Investment in new projects slowed in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. This slowdown led to a decline in the number of projects for the entire year. The region accounted for 26 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries, the second largest share among developing regions. In 2008, 41 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in eight low- or middle-income countries in the region. These projects involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$14.6 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$25.7 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$40.3 billion. That represented an increase of 2 percent from the level reported in 2007. Investment in existing projects, up 12 percent from the level in 2007, drove the increase.
  • Publication
    Investment Commitments Remain at Peak Level in Europe and Central Asia While the Number of New Projects Declines
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-12) Izaguirre, Ada Karina; Fitzgerald, Rossa
    Private activity in infrastructure in Europe and Central Asia showed mixed results in 2008, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure Project database. Investment in new projects slowed sharply in the second half of the year with the full onset of the financial crisis. This slowdown led to a decline in the number of projects for the entire year. The region accounted for 30 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries, the largest share among developing regions. In 2008, 36 infrastructure projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in 11 low- or middle-income countries in the region. These involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$20.3 billion. Infrastructure projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$25.7 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$45.9 billion. That represented an increase of 3 percent from the level reported in 2007 and a new peak for the region. Investment in projects implemented in previous years accounted for the increase, growing by 6 percent from the level in 2007.
  • Publication
    Private Activity in Transport Down for Second Consecutive Year, But Still Around Peak Levels
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-11) Izaguirre, Ada Karina; Jett, Alexander N.
    Private activity in transport declined in 2008, with the full onset of the financial crisis driving a slowdown in the second half of the year. Yet while investment commitments to transport projects with private participation were down from the peak levels of the previous two years, they remained strong at the third highest level in 1990-2008. In 2008, 56 transport projects with private participation reached financial or contractual closure in 26 low- and middle-income countries. These involve investment commitments (hereafter, investment) of US$23.1 billion. Transport projects implemented in previous years had additional commitments of US$2.9 billion, bringing total investment in 2008 to US$26 billion. That represents a drop of 10 percent from the level reported in 2007. Lower payments to governments (such as concession or lease fees and divestiture revenues) account for the decline. By contrast, investments in physical assets, which amounted to US$22.6 billion in 2008, were up 3 percent from those reported in 2007. The number of projects continued a marked declining trend. The 56 projects reaching closure in 2008 reflected a 40 percent decline from the level in 2007 and a 53 percent drop from that in 2006. The closure of larger projects explains the divergence in trends between investments and number of projects. The average project size grew from US$150 million in 2004 to US$410 million in 2008, while the median rose from US$57 million to US$230 million.
  • Publication
    New Private Infrastructure Activity in Developing Countries Recovered in the First Half of 2009 Thanks to the Electricity Sector, But the Crisis Continues to Impact Projects
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-10) Izaguirre, Ada Karina
    New private activity in infrastructure continues to take place in developing countries despite the financial and economic crisis. New projects are being tendered and brought to financial or contractual closure. Measured by amount of investment, the rate of project closure grew by 2 percent in the first half of 2009 compared to the first half of 2008, indicating a strong recovery from the decline of 48 percent experienced in the second half of 2008. This recovery, however, was driven by large projects. Measured by number of projects reaching closure, the rate of project closure continues to be slower than before the full-scale onset of the financial crisis. The number of projects reaching closure in the first half of 2009 was 20 percent lower than the number reported in the first half of 2008. This trend suggests greater project selectivity. Indeed, those projects that are reaching closure are characterized by strong economic and financial fundamentals, the backing of financially solid sponsors and governments. Developing country governments' continuing commitment to their public-private partnership (PPP) programs is confirmed by the number of new projects tendered and awarded. However, current market conditions are forcing governments and investors to restructure projects to improve financial viability. Local public banks as well as bilateral and multilateral agencies continue to be active in project finance, providing a critical amount of funding. It is too early to assess the full impact of the crisis on new infrastructure projects with private participation (PPI). The crisis continues to make financing (both debt and equity) more difficult to secure, and hamper the ability of governments to maintain financial commitments to public-private infrastructure projects.
  • Publication
    Assessment of the Impact of the Crisis on New PPI Projects : Update Three
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-06) Izaguirre, Ada Karina
    Despite the financial and economic crisis, new private activity in infrastructure continues to take place in developing countries. New projects are still being tendered and brought to financial closure, but at a slower pace. Between July 2008 and March 2009, the rate of project closure fell 15 percent by investment compared to a similar period in the previous year. Investment commitments to private infrastructure projects showed some signs of recovery in the first months of 2009, but this recovery was driven by a few large priority projects in select countries. These projects were able to raise financing thanks to the backing of highly-rated sponsors and their priority status in their respective countries. The financial crisis has made financing (both debt and equity) more difficult to secure, and has hampered the ability of governments to maintain their financial commitments to private infrastructure projects. These projects are facing higher cost of financing a problem compounded by the lower demand for infrastructure services that is beginning to impact some sectors. As a result some planned private infrastructure projects are being delayed, restructured, and, to a lesser extent, cancelled. Transport is the worst affected sector so far, while the most affected group of countries are middle-income countries, especially in the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region.
  • Publication
    New Private Infrastructure Projects in Developing Countries Continue to Take Place But Projects are Being Affected by the Financial Crisis
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-03) Izaguirre, Ada Karina
    Throughout the financial crisis, new private activity has continued to take place in developing countries with projects being tendered and brought to financial closure. In the first months of the full-scale of the financial crisis (Aug-Nov 2008), the rate of project closure was 26 percent lower than in the same period in 2007. However, since then private activity recovered and the project closure rate in Aug-Dec 2008 was just 15 percent lower than in the same period in the previous year. The slowdown reflects an initial impact of the financial crisis which has made financing (both debt and equity) more onerous and difficult to secure. Infrastructure projects are facing higher cost of financing, and lower demand for infrastructure services is beginning to impact some sectors. The major impact to date is projects being delayed, and, to a lesser extent, cancelled. Transport and energy are the worst affected sectors so far, while Europe and Central Asia (ECA) and upper middle income countries are the most affected groups of countries. It is too early to assess the full impact of the crisis on new Public Private Infrastructure (PPI) projects. Financial markets remain volatile while the financial crisis has now turned into a global economic crisis. As the 'flight to quality' sets in for banks and other financiers, the likely impact will be more stringent financial conditions, not only via higher cost of financing but also with lower debt/equity ratios, reduced maturities and more conservative risk allocation structures.