Journal articles published externally

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These are journal articles by World Bank authors published externally.

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  • Publication
    Evaluating Job Training in Two Chinese Cities
    (2009) Bidani, Benu; Blunch, Niels-Hugo; Goh, Chor-Ching; O'Leary, Christopher
    Recent years have seen a surge in work on the impacts of active labor market programs for numerous countries. However, little evidence has been presented on the effectiveness of such programs in China. Recent economic reforms, associated with massive lay-offs, and the accompanying public retraining programs make China fertile ground for rigorous impact evaluations. This study uses survey data from the two large industrial cities Shenyang and Wuhan, covering the period 1998 to 2000, to evaluate retraining programs for over 2,000 workers two years after they had been observed as displaced and unemployed. Using a comparison group design, this study is, to our knowledge, the first evaluation of its kind in China. The evidence suggests that retraining helped workers find jobs in Wuhan, but had little effect in Shenyang. The study raises questions about the overall effectiveness of retraining expenditures, and it offers some directions for policy-makers about future interventions to help laid-off workers.
  • Publication
    International Economic Activities and Skilled Labour Demand : Evidence from Brazil and China
    (2009) Fajnzylber, Pablo; Fernandes, Ana M.
    Using two new firm-level datasets, this article investigates the impact of three international economic activities--the use of imported inputs, exports, and foreign direct investment--on skilled labour demand in Brazil and China. We find that Brazilian firms that engage in these activities exhibit a higher skilled labour demand than firms that do not. In contrast, Chinese firms that engage in these activities have a lower skilled labour demand than firms that do not. Thus, international economic activities act as a channel for skill-biased technology diffusion in Brazil but have an effect of specialization according to comparative advantage in unskilled labour-intensive goods in China.