Other ESW Reports

276 items available

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This includes miscellaneous ESW types and pre-2003 ESW type reports that are subsequently completed and released.

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  • Publication
    Partnering with the World Bank through Trust Funds and Umbrella 2.0 Programs: A Guide for Development Partners
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-02-14) World Bank
    This Guide provides a brief overview of World Bank Trust Funds—what they are, what they fund, and the operating environment in which they are managed. It also describes the Umbrella 2.0 Program, an approach to organizing and managing trust funds for greater development impact. In addition, it highlights and provides links to key policies underpinning implementation of activities carried out by the World Bank or by recipients of its funds—policies that apply equally to activities funded by trust fund contributions.
  • Publication
    The Effects of Matching Grants on Technology Startups: The Case of Korea’s TIPS
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2024-01-22) World Bank
    This report investigates the case of a Korean public-private matching grant program called the Tech Incubator Program for Startup (TIPS). Launched in 2013, the program provides a package of support to selected startups, including matching grant for research and development (R and D) and mentorship, for up to three years. After ten years in operation, TIPS is particularly well suited to answer the question of whether public funding can help startups innovate and subsequently improve their performance. Using a dataset that includes 1,650 startups that applied for TIPS between 2013 and 2020, this research analyzes the effects of TIPS on recipients’ performance and offers empirical evidence to inform entrepreneurship policy. The results show that TIPS positively affected startup performance one year after selection in terms of innovation input and output, although it did not have a significant effect on revenue or research collaboration activities. The report concludes with five lessons derived from Korea’s policy experience in designing and implementing TIPS: (i) a well-designed coordination mechanism may serve as a viable public-private partnership model for fostering innovative startups, (ii) a co-investment model can crowd in private investment and achieve a multiplier effect by reducing the risk of investment in early-stage startups, (iii) complementary supports that target different stages of the startup lifecycle are needed, (iv) patient capital and continuity in entrepreneurial policy with a long-term view are key to nurturing a vibrant entrepreneurial ecosystem, and (v) constant engagement with beneficiaries through data collection and monitoring enables the development of a dynamic monitoring and evaluation mechanism.
  • Publication
    Establishing Efficient and Effective Insurance Guarantee Schemes
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-12-14) World Bank
    A well-developed efficient insurance sector plays an important role in any economy. This role is supported by effective regulation and supervision with the aim of having a sound insurance sector that is growing, offering adequate covers, contributing to employment and investment, ensuring reduced exposure to poverty, and increasing shared prosperity. These objectives go beyond merely protecting the interests of policyholders. They recognize that the insurance sector plays a much larger role in the economy, even for those who are not policyholders or beneficiaries. Failure of insurers can undermine these objectives. Failure events might best be defined broadly and from a consumer perspective rather than through a literal analysis of a legal definition. It is clear that such events could have an adverse impact on both the policyholders and beneficiaries directly involved as well as the broader market. As a result, the insurance sector maintains a high level of resilient providers with a well-developed system catering to orderly resolution. It is also noted that politics can add to the challenges of managing an insurer failure. Media and local politics can lead to significant pressure either regionally or nationally. While the normal activity of dealing with a crisis event is drawing heavily on the resources of the supervisory authorities, this additional layer of activity is usually not trivial. In some situations, political engagement is needed to secure the necessary mechanisms for resolution. Given the variety of actual situations that arise, it is often the case that politicians need to be engaged in the solution.
  • Publication
    Unlocking Blue Carbon Development: Investment Readiness Framework for Governments
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-09-11) World Bank
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a practical framework to guide governments in catalyzing and scaling up public and private investment in Blue Carbon as part of their blue economy development. It does this by describing in detail a Blue Carbon Readiness Framework, a step-by-step, well-illustrated guide with simple checklists. Client countries can use the illustrations and checklists to determine their readiness to catalyze and scale up investment in blue carbon credit finance. The Blue Carbon Readiness Framework consists of three pillars: 1. Data and Analytics; 2. Policy and Institutions; 3. Finance.
  • Publication
    PPP Project Screening and Analytics Tool (PSAT 2.0) User Guide
    (Washington, DC, 2023-06-01) World Bank
    Lack of fiscal space and the quest for better efficiency in projects and programs have led to increasing interest in public-private partnerships (PPPs) globally. PPPs are more complex than similar publicly procured projects and require upfront project development expenses that could be significant. Therefore, public entities seek to understand as much as possible about each project before undertaking expensive studies, project structuring, and procurement, which brings to the fore the need for good upstream project selection techniques and methodologies. A review of early-stage PPP screening practices in various countries indicates that a mix of drivers determines PPP project success, often making it difficult for policy makers and practitioners to understand and select projects for further development as PPPs. Complete reliance on quantitative criteria has not worked well, with the result that in the past few years, countries have been opting to combine these with qualitative aspects. Often, screening methodologies have been created based on a country’s policy drivers and areas of focus. Although countries follow different methodologies for screening projects, there are certain common principles used by all. The PPP Project Screening and Analytics Tool (PSAT, or Tool) 2.0 is a Microsoft Excel Visual Basic–based decision-making tool that can be used by countries for the screening and prioritizing of climate resilient PPP projects. The Tool was developed by the Infrastructure Finance, Public-Private Partnerships and Guarantees global practice (IPG) at the World Bank. In 2023 climate change parameters were integrated into the tool and this user manual was updated accordingly. This document is a detailed guide that provides step-by-step instructions on the use of the PSAT 2.0. The User Guide also delves into the mechanics of the PSAT 2.0 and guides the user to customize the Tool to cater to specific requirements.
  • Publication
    The Big Push for Transformation through Climate and Development: Recommendations of the High-Level Advisory Group on Sustainable and Inclusive Recovery and Growth
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2023-02) World Bank Group; International Monetary Fund; London School of Economics and Political Science; Brookings Institution
    This report makes the case for a big investment push for EMDEs’ sustainable recovery and development, assesses the magnitude and composition of such investment, presents actions needed for an energy transition, looks at the role that innovations and state capacity can play in facilitating GRID, and proposes actions that governments, the private sector, MDBs, the IMF, and donors can undertake to mobilize financing at the large scale needed. The report summarizes the insights derived from the meetings of the High-Level Advisory Group (HLAG) on Sustainable and Inclusive Recovery and Growth, jointly led by Mari Pangestu, Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, and Nicholas Stern, and composed of experts from research institutions, the private sector, and governments, as well as senior World Bank Group and IMF staff members. The work of the HLAG, and thus this report, focuses on EMDEs and delves in greater depth into climate investment and financing, particularly for energy transition, as it is a less researched area. While doing so, it recognizes that policy and investment decisions in high-income countries, which accounted for only 16 percent of the global population in 2019 and yet for 32 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions (World Bank 2023a, 2023b), will be critical to whether the Paris Agreement goals can be reached. It also recognizes that these countries must play a key role in contributing financially to EMDEs’ transition to low-carbon economies.
  • Publication
    Mali Public Expenditure Review
    (Washington, DC : World Bank, 2022-03) World Bank
    Mali is a low-income, fragile country that has suffered extraordinary setbacks in recent years. It is a landlocked economy which is highly dependent on agriculture, and thus vulnerable to external shocks and adverse weather condition. With a per capita gross domestic product (GDP) of US 875 dollars (current USD) in 2019, Mali is in the lower 15th percentile of the world’s income distribution. Around 42 percent of the population live in extreme poverty. It is also a fragile state that has witnessed persistent conflict with political coups, social tensions, insecurity, and violence. The coup in 2012 has led to continued violence and displacement, leaving 8.7 million people, more than 45 percent of the population, living in crisis affected areas. It was followed by the military coup in August 2020 which has brought in a transitional civil government. The increasingly fragile security situation has also led to spikes in security expenditure, crowding out spending on public services and investment. This Public Expenditure Review (PER) proposes options to address this challenge, including improving spending efficiency and identifying ways to equitably increase domestic revenue. The policy actions and reforms it proposes will create the fiscal space to promote inclusive and sustainable growth. Starting with an overview of macro-fiscal developments, it examines Mali’s expenditure patterns and fiscal sustainability and benchmarks its performance against peer countries. It reviews the domestic revenue needed to meet the Government’s significant financing requirements and how the public finances are managed. It then investigates public spending efficiency in three sectors: education, health, and agriculture. These were chosen for their economic and social importance as well as their considerable share of public expenditure (over 30 percent). The PER provides some context for each sector, then analyzes financing and efficiency using a set of methodologies based on granular spending data and surveys, and concludes with suggested policy actions.
  • Publication
    Non-Profit Organizations TF Risk Assessment Tool: Identifying the FATF NPOs at Risk of Terrorist Financing Abuse - Guidance Manual
    (Washington, DC, 2022) World Bank
    The National Money Laundering/Terrorist Financing Risk Assessment (NRA) Toolkit has been developed by World Bank Group (WBG) staff members to support WBG client countries and jurisdictions in self-assessing their money laundering and terrorist financing risks.The nonprofit organization (NPO) tool of the NRA Tool serves as an instrument that jurisdictions can use to support their analyses of the terrorist financing abuse of NPOs. Through it, the Working Group will identify NPOs that meet the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) definition, assess the evidence of NPO abuse for terrorist financing, determine the inherent risk (exposure to active terrorist threat), and review the quality of existing mitigation measures. This analysis should seek to complement and draw on national terrorism and terrorist financing risk assessments.
  • Publication
    Virtual Assets and Virtual Asset Service Providers ML/ TF Risk Assessment Tool: Guidance Manual
    (Washington, DC, 2022) World Bank
    The World Bank’s VA and VASP ML/TF Risk Assessment Tool (VA-RA) and this Guidance, aims to assist countries in assessing the ML/TF risks of VA activities and the service providers in the financial and non-financial sectors involved in these activities. It outlines the steps and explanations to assist countries to understand the ML/TF risks associated with VA activities. It examines VA activities and VASPs that fall within the scope of the FATF Recommendations, as these VASPs have the same full set of obligations as financial institutions or Designated Non-Financial Businesses or Professions (DNFBPs). It also considers other actors within the technology providers sector that may fall within the definition of FATF VASPs if they provide any of the functions defined in the FATF Recommendation 15.
  • Publication
    Lebanon : Economic and Social Impact Assessment of the Syrian Conflict
    (Washington, DC, 2013-09-20) World Bank
    To provide a solid basis to define its needs and frame its priorities in terms of the specific assistance it seeks from the international community as well as to inform its own domestic policy response, the Government of Lebanon (GoL) requested the World Bank to lead an Economic and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) of the Syrian conflict on Lebanon. Upon an official request from the Prime Minister of Lebanon, through a letter addressed to the World Bank dated July 25, 2013, this assessment has been conducted under the leadership of the World Bank, in collaboration with the United Nation (UN), the European Union (EU), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The outcome is the present report, of which the accuracy, quality and suitability for further dissemination is the responsibility of the World Bank, with input from the above mentioned key partners.