Other ESW Reports

282 items available

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This includes miscellaneous ESW types and pre-2003 ESW type reports that are subsequently completed and released.

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Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Mexico : Technology, Wages and Employment, Volume 2. Technical Papers
    (Washington, DC, 2001-12-13) World Bank
    The report examines two components of new technology adoption by Mexican manufacturing firms. First, it questions which firms, under what circumstances, and performance adopt such technology. To measure performance, productivity wages, and net employment of a firm were used, leading to further questions on whether technological change helps workers - of a certain skill level - disproportionately. Second, it argues that adoption of new technologies happens under the right circumstances, and further reviews which are the firms, and circumstances surrounding the choice of technology. The analysis is based on data from the National Survey of Employment, Wages, Technology and Training (ENESTYC), and the National Industrial Survey (EIA) for 1992, 1995, and 1999. Results largely suggest that performance (including statistics, and measures on job creation, and/or job dislocation), is superior with technology adoption, though it does not imply performance increases in all firms. Rather, the effects of technology vary depending on location, and size of enterprise. Nonetheless, investments in human capital - training in conjunction with technology adoption - increases productivity benefits. In addition, the likelihood for new technologies, also varies markedly by time period, and, the complexity of the technology correlates both with the size, and skill levels of a firm's work force. Policy recommendations include widespread technology know-how, facilitating inter-firm linkages, supported by both government financing to encourage a competitive business environment, and by a continued increase in research and development funding, public as well as private funding.
  • Publication
    Mexico : Land Policy--A Decade after the Ejido Reform
    (Washington, DC, 2001-06-15) World Bank
    This study aims to assess the extent to which reforms have actually been implemented, the impact they have had on the rural population, and the challenges which, as a consequence, need to be addressed by the new administration. This report is organized as follows: Section 1 describes Mexico's rural economy. It reviews the broad context of macro, trade, and sector-level reforms, the strengths and weaknesses of both the productive and socio-economic structure of agriculture and the social sector, highlighting in particular the socio-economic and natural resource characteristics that make the ejido sector central to Mexico's development. Section 2 details the rationale behind the 1992 legal reforms intended to to end almost a century of politically motivated interventions in the internal structure of te ejido and improve the functioning of land and labor markets in the social sector. This section reviews the way reforms were implemented, the procedural safeguards adopted to prevent abuse, and the advances, both in terms of numbers as well as impact, made in implementing them. Section 3 assesses PROCEDE (the National Certifcation Program of Ejido Rights and Urban Lots) and its impact on the functioning of land rental and sales markets, ejidatarios' access to credit, and investment. Section 4 sums up policy recommendations in six key areas, including land policy, completion of PROCEDE, and ensuring the sustainability of the advances made under PROCEDE.
  • Publication
    Mexico - Fiscal Sustainability (Vol. 1 of 2) : Executive Summary
    (Washington, DC, 2001-06-13) World Bank
    The study reviews the stabilization efforts, and successes that preceded, and have underpinned Mexico's sweeping market-oriented structural reforms since the late 1980s, anchored in strong fiscal adjustment. It seeks to support the Government's efforts, and provides a body of technical analysis, by: correcting fiscal trends for various business-cycle effects; building a simulation model to assess the sensitivity of the fiscal budget to exogenous shocks under structural scenarios; estimating the direct, and indirect potential impact on the fiscal accounts of closing public infrastructure gaps, and funding contingent liabilities; and, consolidating the financial accounts of the main public sector institutions to assess sustainability of their aggregate debt path. Following a brief review on fiscal issues, the report focuses on selected sources of fiscal instability. Chapter I questions the role of fiscal policy in determining output; the responsiveness of the fiscal policy to the business cycle; and, the "persistence" of fiscal policy vs. financing needs, implying the fiscal policy lacks a design that makes it a stabilizing feature of the economy. Chapters II and III investigate the impacts of major exogenous shocks, and provide estimates of the potential payoffs from increased investment in public infrastructure, calculating the optimal infrastructure stocks implied by the elasticity estimates. Chapter IV addresses the measurement of contingent liabilities, within the traditional budget accounting framework, while Chapter V provides estimates of the debt stock at the state level, suggesting disturbing trends in the size, and concentration of the debt are developing, and, sobering evidence on the health of the sub-national pension systems suggest a large percentage of these are either in actuarial deficit, or will be by 2001.
  • Publication
    Mexico - Fiscal Sustainability (Vol. 2 of 2) : Background Papers
    (Washington, DC, 2001-06-13) World Bank
    The study reviews the stabilization efforts, and successes that preceded, and have underpinned Mexico's sweeping market-oriented structural reforms since the late 1980s, anchored in strong fiscal adjustment. It seeks to support the Government's efforts, and provides a body of technical analysis, by: correcting fiscal trends for various business-cycle effects; building a simulation model to assess the sensitivity of the fiscal budget to exogenous shocks under structural scenarios; estimating the direct, and indirect potential impact on the fiscal accounts of closing public infrastructure gaps, and funding contingent liabilities; and, consolidating the financial accounts of the main public sector institutions to assess sustainability of their aggregate debt path. Following a brief review on fiscal issues, the report focuses on selected sources of fiscal instability. Chapter I questions the role of fiscal policy in determining output; the responsiveness of the fiscal policy to the business cycle; and, the "persistence" of fiscal policy vs. financing needs, implying the fiscal policy lacks a design that makes it a stabilizing feature of the economy. Chapters II and III investigate the impacts of major exogenous shocks, and provide estimates of the potential payoffs from increased investment in public infrastructure, calculating the optimal infrastructure stocks implied by the elasticity estimates. Chapter IV addresses the measurement of contingent liabilities, within the traditional budget accounting framework, while Chapter V provides estimates of the debt stock at the state level, suggesting disturbing trends in the size, and concentration of the debt are developing, and, sobering evidence on the health of the sub-national pension systems suggest a large percentage of these are either in actuarial deficit, or will be by 2001.