Other ESW Reports

287 items available

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This includes miscellaneous ESW types and pre-2003 ESW type reports that are subsequently completed and released.

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  • Publication
    Watershed Management and Landscape Restoration Opportunities Assessment for Sioni Reservoir Watershed System in Georgia
    (Washington, DC, 2022-10) World Bank
    This assessment report presents the results of a study focused on the Sioni Reservoir watershed, which is subject to seasonal sediment loads affecting the sustainability of water for hydropower generation and irrigation. The study reveals the major causes of landscape degradation within target watershed and sediment loads to the Sioni Reservoir affecting the suitability of water for irrigation and the lifetime of the dam. The study also identifies the main interventions for landscape restoration and provides a brief analysis of the institutional and policy gaps and recommendations that are applicable for other watersheds in the region as well.
  • Publication
    Georgia Power Sector: Maximizing Finance for Development
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2022-05) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program
    Over the past two decades, the leveraging of private-sector expertise and commercial capital has helped turn around Georgia’s power sector from near-complete operational and financial collapse to a sector that provides secure, affordable, and reliable electricity services to Georgian customers. However, the government may not be able to sustain the current model of financing of electricity sector investments given the expected public debt and fiscal impacts. This study develops recommendations for optimizing available financing for electricity generation and transmission investments while limiting the impacts on public finance needs and fiscal risks. To this end, the study presents: (i) a summary of the historical and required investment needs in the power generation and transmission segments; (ii) a review of the constraints to mobilizing private and commercial financing with limited impact on fiscal risks; and (iii) the development of a reform roadmap to enable sustainable financing of investments in electricity generation and transmission. The objectives of this study are to: (a) identify the obstacles to optimizing available financing for power generation and transmission investments while limiting the impacts on the public finances, and (b) present recommendations to overcoming those obstacles.
  • Publication
    Georgia Beyond Arrivals: Emerging Opportunities for Georgian Firms in Tourism Value Chains
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2019-12-27) World Bank Group
    Georgia’s current tourism offering is oriented toward low-spending neighboring markets and,although there is growth in high-spend global markets, the share is still very small. The majority of international visitor trips are from Georgia’s neighboring countries—Russia, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Turkey. This strong regional footprint is partly attributable to Georgia’s reputation during Soviet times as a recreational destination. Proximity, low prices, familiarity and language have contributed to this strong position. However, of Georgia’s top 15 source markets, tourists from Azerbaijan, Armenia and Turkey have the lowest average total trip expenditure and make the shortest trips. Although Georgia has seen very strong growth from China and India, arrivals to Georgia from the top global tourism source markets1 in 2018 represented only 7.3 percent of arrivals to the country. Georgia’s government is targeting high-growth, high-spend source markets. In 2015, the Government of Georgia (GoG) launched “Georgia Tourism 2025”; a 10-year vision and strategic plan for increasing the value and importance of tourism for the benefit of the country’s economy and ultimately its citizens. The plan—developed with support from the World Bank Group—included infrastructure development, country promotion, service quality improvement and tourism product diversification. Building on this plan, in 2018, GoG developed a marketing, branding and promotional strategy to communicate Georgia’s brand positioning, visual and verbal identity guidelines, and promotional objectives and target high growth, high-spend source markets. As Georgia’s source markets evolve, new GVC structures necessary to serve those markets will alsoemerge. GoG has identified 26 key source markets based on accessibility, economic factors, culturalrelations, and other factors such as the size of diaspora, historical ties and language barriers. A shift towards these new markets will also correspond to changes in consumer behavioral trends and tastes. This, coupled with global industry trends will see new value chain structures emerge, emphasizing activities with differing competitive forces, and presenting differing opportunities to create and retain value. Georgian firms may need support to respond to changes in emerging tourism GVCs and compete for higher-value-added activities. The report asks and answers two questions: i) How are emerging trends changing the structure of Tourism GVCs and how can Georgian firms benefit from these changes? ii) What policy reforms, capital investment or skills development is needed to increase Georgia’s value chain competitiveness in each of these key tourism offerings?