Other ESW Reports

291 items available

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This includes miscellaneous ESW types and pre-2003 ESW type reports that are subsequently completed and released.

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  • Publication
    Yemen Poverty Assessment : Volume 2. Annexes
    (Washington, DC, 2007-11) World Bank
    From what was historically known as 'Arabia Felix', a land of prosperity and happiness, Yemen has become the most impoverished among the Arab countries. The government of the united Yemen, formed in 1990, has launched so far three five-year economic reform plans with the goal of restoring Yemen's prosperity. Have these efforts succeeded? What policies are needed to further reduce poverty? The poverty assessment report aims to answer these questions. This report measures poverty in Yemen in 2005-06, and evaluates the change in poverty compared to 1998, the two years for which comparable household budget surveys are available. The period between the two survey years (1998 and 2005-06), more or less overlaps the first two five-year economic plans and captures the effect of the economic reform programs launched since 1995. In addition to measuring poverty, this report has three objectives: evaluating the role of growth and past reforms on poverty, identifying better ways to target the vulnerable poor through public action, and an assessment of the poverty monitoring system. By examining the effect of the key policies on poverty, such as the petroleum price reform and the government's social protection mechanisms between 1998 and 2005-06, the study aims to equip policy makers and development partners with the knowledge needed to improve the effectiveness of their efforts to reduce poverty in Yemen.
  • Publication
    India - Jharkhand : Addressing the Challenges of Inclusive Development
    (Washington, DC, 2007-03) World Bank
    This study on Jharkhand in India addresses the challenges faced by that new state of India (founded in November 2000) to surmount adverse initial conditions of low average income, very high incidence of poverty, and little social development. In addition, initial health and education indicators in Jharkhand were also markedly unfavorable in comparison to both the all-India average and the major Indian states. The paper points out that in order to put its fiscal house in order, the state needs to introduce reforms for improving resource mobilization, increasing cost effectiveness of expenditure and rationalizing the budgetary processes. Improvement of infrastructure is critically important, and once this has occurred, this will lead to favorable pro-poor changes in the labor market as well. Two opposite views of the development debate are represented by the different degrees of importance given to mining and agriculture. One view contends that the development of the mining sector can usher in a new decade of development in Jharkhand. The second view is that the potential risks associated with the mining sector are high and that agriculture has shown great potential through impressive growth in recent years contributing significantly to poverty reduction and human resource development. Given the strengths and weaknesses of the two options, the present study suggests a middle path, aiming at an inter-temporal balance between the two strategies. The paper stresses that social inclusion and effective citizenship for all are desirable outcomes everywhere, especially in Jharkhand with its sharp social and regional divide. It concludes that political commitment is needed to "make development happen" in the shortest possible time.
  • Publication
    Vietnam 2010 : Entering the 21st Century
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2000-11-29) World Bank; Asian Development Bank; United Nations Development Program
    The study outlines the socioeconomic development strategy for Vietnam, during the first decade of the twenty first century, envisaging sustainable economic development, to rapidly adjust to social stability, while maintaining cultural, and traditional ties. The aim is to become a socialist market economy, fully integrated into the global economy, internationally competitive, with characteristics of an industrialized, and knowledge-based society within twenty years. This vision articulates the eradication of hunger, and hard-core poverty, emphasizing universal lower secondary education. Likewise, it intends to reduce child malnutrition, increase life expectancy, and raise access to clean water in urban areas. However, the vision requires a doubling of the GDP by 2010, through increased investments and growing exports, declining agricultural inputs, but increasing the industrial, and services share. Part I of the report, still undergoing extensive consultations within the Government, and civil society, provides the strategic directions for the country, examining enterprise development, rural development, human and social development, infrastructure, environmental quality, and governance. Part II addresses stronger partnerships to help the Government implement this strategy, through a series of thematic notes, which describe donor participation, and international development assistance.