Doing Business Regional, National, and Subnational Reports

1,646 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

This collection holds the regional, national, and subnational serial publications.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Publication
    Doing Business in Central America and the Dominican Republic 2015: Overview
    (Washington, DC, 2015) World Bank Group
    The strengthening of sustained and inclusive economic growth providing opportunities for all and reducing inequality is a key to achieving shared prosperity in Central America and the Dominican Republic. However, the countries in this region except for Panama and Costa Rica have not yet attained growth driven by high productivity. Foreign trade grew less in Central America than in other regions. Other studies reveal that the areas having the greatest impact on trade costs and volumes are information availability, process improvement through the use of online tools, and document simplification and streamlining. The strengthening of the business environment is a key action within these countries' competitiveness and productivity agenda. If laws and regulations are clear, accessible, and transparent, while at the same time they are enforceable before a court of justice if necessary, entrepreneurs will have more time to devote to productive activities and will feel more confident to run the risk of doing business with people they don't know, which may contribute to the expansion of their client and supplier network, thereby making their business grow. Doing business in Central America and the Dominican Republic 2015 for the first time includes a gender perspective based on the study of the laws and regulations that impose differential treatment for women.
  • Publication
    Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Sudan
    (Washington, DC, 2014-10) World Bank Group
    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Sudan. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Sudan ranks 160. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business known as indicators. Ten of these areas are included in this year's ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year's ranking. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2014 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2013).
  • Publication
    Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Finland
    (Washington, DC, 2014-10-01) World Bank Group
    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Finland. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Finalnd ranks 9. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business known as indicators. Ten of these areas are included in this year's ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year's ranking. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2014 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2013).
  • Publication
    Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Samoa
    (Washington, DC, 2014-10-01) World Bank Group
    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Samoa. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Samoa ranks 67. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business known as indicators. Ten of these areas are included in this year's ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year's ranking. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2014 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2013).
  • Publication
    Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Kiribati
    (Washington, DC, 2014-10-01) World Bank Group
    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Kiribati. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Kiribati ranks 134. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business known as indicators. Ten of these areas are included in this year's ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year's ranking. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2014 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2013).
  • Publication
    Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Romania
    (Washington, DC, 2014-10) World Bank Group
    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Romania. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Romania ranks 48. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business known as indicators. Ten of these areas are included in this year's ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year's ranking. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2014 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2013).
  • Publication
    Paying Taxes 2014 : The Global Picture
    (World Bank Group, Washington, DC, 2013-11-19) PricewaterhouseCoopers; World Bank Group
    Paying Taxes 2014 looks at tax regimes in 189 economies as part of the Doing Business series. The period covered by the study, 2004 to 2012, has seen the end of a sustained period of economic growth, a severe recession and a slow recovery. Governments continue to be under the pressure balance the need to attract investment and foster growth while generating tax revenues. This report finds that governments continue to reform their tax systems despite global economic uncertainty, with 32 economies having taken steps from June last year through May 2013 to make it easier and cost less for small and medium businesses to pay taxes. The report finds that the most common tax reform undertaken by 11 economies is the introduction or improvement of electronic filing, eliminating the need for 74 separate tax payments and reducing compliance time by almost 200 hours in total. On average around the world it now takes our case study company 268 hours to comply with its taxes, it makes 26.7 payments and has an average total tax rate of 43.1 percent. The range for each sub-indicator is very wide. The number of payments ranges from 3 in Hong Kong SAR, China and Saudi Arabia to 71 in República Bolivariana de Venezuela. The time to comply is lowest in the United Arab Emirates where it takes 12 hours to deal with the taxes that apply, all of which are labor taxes. The highest number of hours is still taken by our company in Brazil. It takes 2,600 hours with more than half of this time being spent on consumption taxes. Until 2008, 7 of the 8 geographical regions covered in the report had consistently recorded a fall in their average total tax rate. This changed in 2009 when only 5 regions recorded a fall. This fell to 3 in 2011 and in the latest study only Africa and South America show a fall in the total tax rate while all other regions show an increase apart from Asia Pacific and EU and EFTA where rates of 36.6 percent and 42.5 percent respectively have been maintained. Over the nine years of the study the total tax rate attributable to profit taxes have fallen faster than that for labor taxes so that labor taxes are now the largest element of the total tax rate. While the average time to comply has fallen by 55 hours over the 9 years of the study, the rate of decline has slowed dramatically in the most recent period, falling by only 1 hour between 2011 and 2012. Over the nine years of study, the greatest improvement on time has been seen for labor taxes (23 hours). The number of hours has fallen by 19 hours for consumption taxes and by 13 hours for corporate income tax.
  • Publication
    Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Kiribati
    (World Bank Group, Washington, DC, 2013-10-29) World Bank; International Finance Corporation
    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Kiribati. In a series of annual reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. This year's report data cover regulations measured from June 2012 through May 2013. The report is the 11th edition of the Doing Business series.
  • Publication
    Doing Business 2014 Regional Profile : East African Community
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2013-10-29) World Bank; International Finance Corporation
    Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 11 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency and employing workers. This regional profile presents the Doing Business indicators for economies in East African Community (EAC). It also shows the regional average, the best performance globally for each indicator and data for the following comparator regions: Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), Middle East and North Africa (MENA), Organization for the Harmonization of Business Law in Africa (OHADA) and OECD High Income.
  • Publication
    Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Small Island States
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2013-10-29) World Bank; International Finance Corporation
    This regional profile presents the Doing Business indicators for economies in Small Island States. It also shows the regional average, the best performance globally for each indicator and data for the following comparator regions: Caribbean States, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, Latin America, and Southern African Development Community. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2013, except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period January to December 2012. Regional Doing Business reports capture differences in business regulations and their enforcement across countries in a single region. They provide data on the ease of doing business, rank each location, and recommend reforms to improve performance in each of the indicator areas. The report sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 11 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency and employing workers. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies, from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, over time. The data set covers 47 economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, 33 in Latin America and the Caribbean, 25 in East Asia and the Pacific, 25 in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, 20 in the Middle East and North Africa and 8 in South Asia, as well as 31 OECD high-income economies. The indicators are used to analyze economic outcomes and identify what reforms have worked, where and why.