Portuguese PDFs Available

117 items available

Permanent URI for this collection

The following titles are also available in Portuguese. Click on the title link and look toward the bottom of the page to locate the PDFs that can be downloaded for that title.

Items in this collection

Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    The World Bank Group Beyond the Crisis
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-10-09) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, addressed the following issues: seeds of crisis; the changing context; responsible globalization; the current role of the World Bank Group; the role of the World Bank Group in a new post-crisis World; and the reform agenda. He pointed to four aspects of Group’s future role: development finance; delivering knowledge products; the global public goods agenda (such as climate change and communicable diseases); and unforeseen future crises. Reform efforts include: 1) improving development effectiveness with a focus on results, decentralization, gender, investment lending reform, and human resources; 2) promoting accountability and good governance, and 3) increasing cost efficiency. He noted the completion of recent enhancements to the voice and representation of developing and transition countries in the Bank Group. Bretton Woods is being overhauled before our eyes.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    After the Crisis?
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-09-28) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank Group, discussed the implications of the 2009 financial upheaval that is changing our world. He addressed the following: (i) what are the perceptions and realities of power after this crisis?; (ii) will the U.S. dollar remain the predominant reserve currency?; (iii) will democratic governments permit independent central banks to assume even more authority?; (iv) is the global trading system keeping up with the demands of the global economy?; and (v) what will be the role of developing countries after the crisis? He stressed the opportunity to craft a new system of “Responsible Globalization” allowing balanced growth, financial stability, countering climate change, and advancing opportunities for the poorest.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Seizing Opportunity from Crisis: Making Multilateralism Work
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-03-31) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, recalled a moment in John Maynard Keynes life when he called for deeds that restore the public trust that governments are up to the challenge of the current crisis. What started in 2007 as a financial crisis quickly spiraled into an economic crisis, with estimates for 2009 for the first contraction of the global economy since World War II and the largest decline of trade in 80 years. Developing countries are being battered in successive waves as private capital flows slump sharply. These events could next become a social and human crisis, with political implications. Zoellick reviewed the difficulties for each region of the world. Unlike the 1930s, however, central banks have stepped in with creative solutions to keep credit flowing. But the challenge ahead requires a spirit of innovation backed by action. The World Bank Group’s Board is considering a new proposal: the launch of a $50 billion Global Trade Liquidity Program. Zoellick called for the member of the G-20 to make multilateralism work and to empower the WTO, the IMF, and the World Bank Group to monitor national policies. Bringing sunlight to national decision-making would contribute to transparency, accountability, and consistency across national policies. It is time to institutionalize “early warning” systems to protect the poor from cuts in social programs during times of economic crisis. Modern multilateralism will require that rising economic powers have a larger say in how institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF are run.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography
    (World Bank, 2009) World Bank
    Places do well when they promote transformations along the dimensions of economic geography: higher densities as cities grow; shorter distances as workers and businesses migrate closer to density; and fewer divisions as nations lower their economic borders and enter world markets to take advantage of scale and trade in specialized products. World Development Report 2009 concludes that the transformations along these three dimensions density, distance, and division are essential for development and should be encouraged. The conclusion is controversial. Slum-dwellers now number a billion, but the rush to cities continues. A billion people live in lagging areas of developing nations, remote from globalizations many benefits. And poverty and high mortality persist among the world’s bottom billion, trapped without access to global markets, even as others grow more prosperous and live ever longer lives. Concern for these three intersecting billions often comes with the prescription that growth must be spatially balanced. This report has a different message: economic growth will be unbalanced. To try to spread it out is to discourage it to fight prosperity, not poverty. But development can still be inclusive, even for people who start their lives distant from dense economic activity. For growth to be rapid and shared, governments must promote economic integration, the pivotal concept, as this report argues, in the policy debates on urbanization, territorial development, and regional integration. Instead, all three debates overemphasize place-based interventions. Reshaping Economic Geography reframes these debates to include all the instruments of integration spatially blind institutions, spatially connective infrastructure, and spatially targeted interventions. By calibrating the blend of these instruments, today’s developers can reshape their economic geography. If they do this well, their growth will still be unbalanced, but their development will be inclusive.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Using the Results of a National Assessment of Educational Achievement
    (World Bank, 2009) Kellaghan, Thomas ; Greaney, Vincent ; Murray, T. Scott
    This book, the fifth and final volume of the National Assessments of Educational Achievement series, draws on the experiences of over forty countries that have implemented a national assessment. It considers the role of contextual factors which impinge on the use of assessment findings. The attachment of sanctions to performance on a national assessment and use of assessment results for accountability are discussed. Key components of a national assessment report are specified . Other instruments to communicate findings are described. Uses of national assessment findings for policy, management, teaching, and raising public awareness are described. A number of ways in which the use and value of national assessments could be optimized are proposed. This volume is intended primarily for teams who are responsible for conducting national assessments and policy makers responsible for the dissemination and use of national assessment results.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Modernizing Multilateralism and Markets
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2008-10-13) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President the World Bank Group, delivered remarks on the following six strategic themes: a new multilateralism; priorities on a new steering group; international finance and development; the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the global trading system; energy and climate change; and fragile states and securing development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Modernizing Multilateralism and Markets
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2008-10-06) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, addresses these topics: (i) looking back –to see ahead; (ii) transformation in the global political economy; (iii) storm clouds over multilateralism and markets; (iv) a new multilateral network for a new global economy; (v) a new steering group; (vi) the WTO and the global trading system; (vii) energy and climate change; and (viii) fragile states.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Environmental Licensing for Hydroelectric Projects in Brazil : A Contribution to the Debate
    (Washington, DC, 2008-03-28) World Bank
    This study points out that hydroelectric plants will continue to play a prominent role in the Brazilian electric matrix. A significant portion of the potential hydroelectric plants of the country is located in the Amazon, environmentally sensitive region. The licensing of hydroelectric projects in Brazil is considered a major obstacle for the expanding the capacity of generating electricity. The non-expansion, in turn, represents a serious threat to economic growth. This study, designed as a contribution to the debate in progress about the subject, examines the legal and institutional milestones of the environmental licensing of hydroelectric ventures, including studies of selected cases, an assessment of transaction costs of the processes and a comparison with international practices. Two conclusions emerge from this study. The first is that the costs of dealing with environmental issues and social development of enterprises hydroelectric in Brazil represent 12 percent of the total cost of the work. And the second is that costs of taxes, in general, the contractual and regulatory uncertainty, excluding the licensing environmental, represent about 7.5 percent of the total cost. In other words, the conclusion is clear: the environmental and social costs can be easily integrated. This study does not suggest radical changes to the system of environmental licensing. Any reform of the Brazilian environmental licensing can not be dealt with based on a single, simple solution. Rather, the system is complex and multifaceted, with a long legal and institutional history. A process of broad national discussion on the energy issue and its implications for environmental goods of the country is essential and is already in progress.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Debt Management Performance Assessment Tool
    (Washington, DC, 2008-02-05) World Bank
    The World Bank is developing a program to assist developing countries improve debt management in collaboration with other partners. The objective of the program is to help strengthen capacity and institutions in developing countries to manage government debt in an effective and sustainable manner in the medium to long term. A cornerstone of the program is the Debt Management Performance Assessment Tool (DeMPA), a methodology for assessing performance through a comprehensive set of performance indicators spanning the full range of government debt management (DeM) functions. The intention is that the indicator set will be an internationally recognized standard in the government debt management field and may be applied in all developing countries. The DeMPA highlights strengths and weaknesses in government DeM practices in each country. Performance assessment facilitates the design of plans to build and augment capacity and institutions tailored to the specific needs of a country. The debt management performance report will not, however, contain specific recommendations or make assumptions as to the potential impact of ongoing reforms on government DeM performance. The DeMPA also facilitates the monitoring of progress over time in achieving the objectives of government DeM consistent with international sound practice. [Revised November 2008]
  • Thumbnail Image
    Publication
    Debt Management Performance Assessment : Sao Tome and Principe
    (Washington, DC, 2008-02) World Bank
    During February 2-14, 2008 a World Bank team comprised of Per-Olof Jonsson and Frederico Gil Sander traveled to Sao Tome e Príncipe to undertake an assessment of the government's debt management capacity and institutions using the Debt Management Performance Assessment Tool (DeMPA). The DeMPA is a methodology for assessing government debt management (DeM) performance through a comprehensive set of indicators spanning the full range of DeM functions. The assessment reveals that despite notable progress since the inception of the debt office in 2004, overall Sao Tome Príncipe meets the minimum requirements set out by the DeMPA only in the fields of evaluation of debt management operations and coordination with monetary policy. The Government does not meet the minimum requirements in the other indicators. The gap between existing practices and the minimum requirements is narrow in some areas. Among the areas for improvement where greater effort is required to reach good practices, the mission identified the legal framework and the managerial structures as key priorities in a reform program.