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  • Publication
    The End of the Third World?: Modernizing Multilateralism for a Multipolar World
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2010-04-14) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank Group, spoke on the theme that we are now in a new, fast-evolving multipolar world economy in which outdated classifications no longer fit. He discussed these topics: (i) the end of the third world; (ii) multilateralism matters; (iii) new sources of demand; (iv) new poles of growth; (v) Africa as a potential pole of growth; (vi) economic shifts mean potential power shifts; (vii) the danger of geo-politics as usual; (viii) financial reform; (ix) climate change; (x) managing for crisis response; (xi) new role for rising powers; (xii) what does this changing world mean for development?; (xiii) modernizing multilateral institutions; (xiv) reforming to become more representative and legitimate; and (xv) reforming by adding resources; and (xvi) reforming to become more effective, innovative, and accountable. We need a League of Networks.
  • Publication
    The World Bank Group Beyond the Crisis
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-10-09) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, addressed the following issues: seeds of crisis; the changing context; responsible globalization; the current role of the World Bank Group; the role of the World Bank Group in a new post-crisis World; and the reform agenda. He pointed to four aspects of Group’s future role: development finance; delivering knowledge products; the global public goods agenda (such as climate change and communicable diseases); and unforeseen future crises. Reform efforts include: 1) improving development effectiveness with a focus on results, decentralization, gender, investment lending reform, and human resources; 2) promoting accountability and good governance, and 3) increasing cost efficiency. He noted the completion of recent enhancements to the voice and representation of developing and transition countries in the Bank Group. Bretton Woods is being overhauled before our eyes.
  • Publication
    After the Crisis?
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-09-28) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank Group, discussed the implications of the 2009 financial upheaval that is changing our world. He addressed the following: (i) what are the perceptions and realities of power after this crisis?; (ii) will the U.S. dollar remain the predominant reserve currency?; (iii) will democratic governments permit independent central banks to assume even more authority?; (iv) is the global trading system keeping up with the demands of the global economy?; and (v) what will be the role of developing countries after the crisis? He stressed the opportunity to craft a new system of “Responsible Globalization” allowing balanced growth, financial stability, countering climate change, and advancing opportunities for the poorest.
  • Publication
    Seizing Opportunity from Crisis: Making Multilateralism Work
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2009-03-31) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, recalled a moment in John Maynard Keynes life when he called for deeds that restore the public trust that governments are up to the challenge of the current crisis. What started in 2007 as a financial crisis quickly spiraled into an economic crisis, with estimates for 2009 for the first contraction of the global economy since World War II and the largest decline of trade in 80 years. Developing countries are being battered in successive waves as private capital flows slump sharply. These events could next become a social and human crisis, with political implications. Zoellick reviewed the difficulties for each region of the world. Unlike the 1930s, however, central banks have stepped in with creative solutions to keep credit flowing. But the challenge ahead requires a spirit of innovation backed by action. The World Bank Group’s Board is considering a new proposal: the launch of a $50 billion Global Trade Liquidity Program. Zoellick called for the member of the G-20 to make multilateralism work and to empower the WTO, the IMF, and the World Bank Group to monitor national policies. Bringing sunlight to national decision-making would contribute to transparency, accountability, and consistency across national policies. It is time to institutionalize “early warning” systems to protect the poor from cuts in social programs during times of economic crisis. Modern multilateralism will require that rising economic powers have a larger say in how institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF are run.
  • Publication
    Modernizing Multilateralism and Markets
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2008-10-13) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President the World Bank Group, delivered remarks on the following six strategic themes: a new multilateralism; priorities on a new steering group; international finance and development; the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the global trading system; energy and climate change; and fragile states and securing development.
  • Publication
    Modernizing Multilateralism and Markets
    (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2008-10-06) Zoellick, Robert B.
    Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank, addresses these topics: (i) looking back –to see ahead; (ii) transformation in the global political economy; (iii) storm clouds over multilateralism and markets; (iv) a new multilateral network for a new global economy; (v) a new steering group; (vi) the WTO and the global trading system; (vii) energy and climate change; and (viii) fragile states.
  • Publication
    Moving Forward from Singapore
    (2006-09-20) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, discussed giving the poor people of the world a chance to escape poverty. He spoke about the actions to promote good governance that are crucial to successful economic development, poverty reduction and helping member countries achieve the Millennium Development Goals. He mentioned issues of global import, particularly the prospects for the Doha Round and the issue of clean, efficient, and affordable energy. He concluded by saying that the Bank Group will continue to remain active in a variety of international efforts to provide global public goods.
  • Publication
    Path to Prosperity
    (2006-09-19) Wolfowitz,Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, discussed Singapore's remarkable progress along the road from poverty to prosperity which has also been discovered by many other countries in East Asia and around the world. He spoke of how each country must find its own path for people to pursue the same dreams of the chance to go to school, the security of a good job, and the ability to provide a better future for their children. Throughout the world, and importantly in the developing world, there is a growing recognition that the path to prosperity must be built on a solid foundation of good governance. Rich countries that have a vital responsibility in the fight against corruption and the need to take action against bribe givers who often come from their countries and to help the developing country partners recover stolen assets. He concluded by saying that the Bank’s mission is to help pave the way for the poor by giving them opportunity to work, so that they can take control of their own destiny.
  • Publication
    Charting a Way Ahead: The Results Agenda
    (2005-09-24) Wolfowitz, Paul
    Paul Wolfowitz, President of the World Bank, makes the case for ending poverty in our lifetime, especially in Africa. There is an urgent need for action, because thousands of people living in extreme poverty, many of them children, die every day from preventable diseases. The call to end poverty reaches across generations, continents, and nationalities. It spans religions, gender, and politics. Wolfowitz claims that the world is at a turning point, with grounds for hope. The last few decades have witnessed dramatic improvement in the condition of the world's poorest people. He cites as key factors leadership and accountability, respect for women, civil society, the private sector, and legal empowerment of the poor. He concludes that in order to find solutions for alleviating poverty, the World Bank needs to strengthen its knowledge and expertise in such areas as education, health, infrastructure, energy and sustainable development, and agriculture. We must chart a course for a future in which today's poor become tomorrow's entrepreneurs.
  • Publication
    Coalitions for Change
    (1999-09-28) Wolfensohn, James D.
    World Bank Group President, James Wolfensohn addressed the Board of Governors. In the past year the Bank launched a new initiative—the Comprehensive Development Framework (CDF). The aim was to bring the social and the structural aspects of development together with the macroeconomic and the financial so as to establish a much more balanced and effective approach. The Bank will work with the broad development community—the United Nations, the European Union, bilaterals, regional development banks, civil society, and the private sector—to build genuine partnerships. The CDF is now being piloted in 13 countries. The general experience reviewed that strengthening the organization, human capacity, and the structure of the state, both at central and local levels, is the first priority to reduce poverty. The speaker also called for a coalition for change in the new international development architecture in the face of globalization.