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  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part I. Corporate Governance Introduced
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-22) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part III. Disclosure and Transparency
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-17) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part V. Special Focus Section
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-17) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part II. Good Board Practices
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-17) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part VI. Annexes, Model Corporate Governance Documents
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-17) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part IV. Information Disclosure and Transparency
    (Washington, DC, 2004-09-17) International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce
    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issues, such as a company's board structure, information disclosure practices, and shareholder rights. Part five focuses on corporate governance issues of particular importance in the Russian context, namely corporate governance concerns during a company's reorganization, within holding structures, and relating to enforcement. Part six, finally, offers practical tools in the form of model documents, for example company codes, by-laws, and contracts. All issues are closely examined through Russian law and regulations; the Federal Commission for the Securities Market's Code of Corporate Conduct (FCSM Code) Code and, when applicable, internationally recognized best practices. This manual also provides government officials, lawyers, judges, investors, and others with a framework for assessing the level of corporate governance practices in Russian companies. Finally, it serves as a reference tool for the educational institutions that will train the next generation of Russian managers, investors, and policy makers on good corporate governance practices.
  • Publication
    A Model for Calculating Interconnection Costs in Telecommunications
    (Washington, DC: World Bank and the Public–Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility, 2004) Um, Paul Noumba; Gille, Laurent; Simon, Lucile; Rudelle, Christophe
    Since the past decade, several Sub-Saharan African governments, through technical assistance provided by the World Bank and other donors, have undertaken to reform their telecommunications sectors, by implementing market liberalization policies, privatizing the incumbent public operator, and creating autonomous and independent regulatory bodies. The core objective of these reforms is to significantly improve access, and affordability, to telecommunications services on the basis of the assumption that a more friendly and predictable business environment will attract more private investment. However, the provision of interconnection services, on fair and efficient terms, has rapidly emerged as a main bottleneck. In fact, new legislation and regulations enacted in Sub-Saharan Africa recognize the interconnection rights ascribed to all telecommunications service providers and network operators. In addition, these regulations also request the incumbent fixed operator to supply interconnection services to new entrants on a fair and competitive basis. Despite the clarity and soundness of the legislative provisions in that respect (cost oriented, nondiscriminatory, fair, and transparent), the number of interconnection disputes has increased, and long-lasting interconnection disputes have discredited the reputation and credibility of new regulatory regimes.
  • Publication
    Education and HIV/AIDS : A Sourcebook of HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs
    (Washington, DC, 2004) World Bank
    This sourcebook aims to support efforts by countries to strengthen the role of the education sector in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. It was developed in response to numerous requests for a simple forum to help countries share their practical experiences of designing and implementing programs that are targeted at school-age children. The sourcebook seeks to fulfill this role by providing concise summaries of programs, using a standard format that highlights the main elements of the programs and makes it easier to compare the programs with each other. All the programs are summarized in section two, which allows those seeking advice on program design to browse through the various options and identify those that might reward further study. The full program reports for each country are given in section three. Each program report follows the same format, so the reader can more easily find those aspects of the program that are of specific interest. The consistent design also allows for ease of comparison between programs. There are four main sections within each full program report. Part A gives an overview of the program, describing the rationale, the aims and objectives, the target audience, the components, and the main approaches. Part B describes the process from the initial needs assessment, through the development of materials and training, to the practical details of implementation. There is an attempt made to estimate unit costs, but these should be seen only as indicative, because the number of beneficiaries is often uncertain and because costs in newly implemented programs may be artificially high. Part C provides an assessment and comprises lessons learned. This section begins with comments from implementers on the challenges faced and the lessons learned, followed in a few cases by a description of any formal evaluation of the program. The final part explores the extent to which the program complies with a set of benchmarks that, on the basis of expert opinion, contribute to an effective program. Part D gives details of the organizations involved with the program, including their contact information. It lists all the materials that are available to the reader, along with an order code number.
  • Publication
    Labor Issues in Infrastructure Reform : A Toolkit, Modules 2-7
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2004) Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility
    A universal concern in infrastructure reforms is the effect such reforms have on labor. State-owned infrastructure firms often employ more people than required for efficiency, and often under favorable terms and conditions of service, leading to lower labor productivity and higher labor costs than private employers would bear. Some reform, in particular those involving private participation in infrastructure (PPI), may thus prompt surplus labor and changes in working conditions as governments adjust the work force to prepare for PPI, or as new owners or operators introduce efficiency improvements and expose enterprises to greater management discipline, new technologies, and increasing competition. The primary objective of this Toolkit is to provide practical tools and information to help policymakers handle labor issues in private participation in infrastructure (PPI). The Toolkit consists of seven modules: 1) Framework and overview of the entire toolkit; 2) Labor impacts of PPI; 3) Assessing the size and scope of labor restructuring; 4) Strategies and options; 5) Key elements of a labor program; 6) Engaging with stakeholders; 7) Monitoring and evaluation of labor programs. The Toolkit also contains a web-based CD-ROM with searchable documents, spreadsheets, sample terms of reference for obtaining the needed expertise to carry out various labor-related tasks, case studies, and other relevant data.
  • Publication
    Ten Steps to a Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System : A Handbook for Development Practitioners
    (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2004) Zall Kusek, Jody; Rist, Ray C.
    An effective state is essential to achieving socio-economic and sustainable development. With the advent of globalization, there are growing pressures on governments and organizations around the world to be more responsive to the demands of internal and external stakeholders for good governance, accountability and transparency, greater development effectiveness, and delivery of tangible results. Governments, parliaments, citizens, the private sector, Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs), civil society, international organizations, and donors are among the stakeholders interested in better performance. As demands for greater accountability and real results have increased, there is an attendant need for enhanced results-based monitoring and evaluation of policies, programs, and projects. This handbook provides a comprehensive ten-step model that will help guide development practitioners through the process of designing and building a results-based monitoring and evaluation system. These steps begin with a 'readiness assessment' and take the practitioner through the design, management, and importantly, the sustainability of such systems. The handbook describes each step in detail, the tasks needed to complete each one, and the tools available to help along the way.